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TitleShort panel abstractKeywordsConvenor 1Convenor 2Convenor 3Long panel abstract
21st Century Hi-Tech Children and Youth Creating World SolidarityThe panel examines the role of youth as hi-tech netizens using advanced cyber technology and social media to challenge and transcend global geopolitical barriers and link diverse multi-generational global cultures online through universal messages of solidarity, development, peace and harmony.Cyber-Technology, universality, childhood, solidarity, peaceAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Deepak Kumar Behera
Institution / affiliation: Chair, Commission on Anthropology of Children, Youth and Childhood, IUAES, and Former Professor, and Head, Dept. of Anthropology, Sambalpur University
City: Sambalpur
Country: India
Academic Degree: Master of Arts
Name: Dwiti Chandragupta Vikramaditya
Institution / affiliation: Deputy Chair, Commission on Anthropology of Children, Youth and Childhood, IUAES, and Advisor, Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences
City: Bhubaneswar
Country: India
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Lidia Julianna Guzy
Institution / affiliation: Head of the Study of Religions Department and Lecturer in Contemporary South Asian Religions, University College Cork (UCC)
City: Cork
Country: Ireland
In this rapidly evolving digital age, technology and social media have become critical tools of communication and collaboration, allowing cyber citizens to form likeminded global communities irrespective of existing geopolitical barriers. With over 3 billion people using the internet, children and youth are one of the largest consumer groups embracing cyber technology and a variety of social media platforms.

This panel seeks to understand the role of youth groups in successfully transcending barriers to form hi-tech global online communities that connect in solidarity over universal messages of peace, development, and harmony. Cyber-technology and social media have become highly efficient global communication infrastructure that allow knowledge to become more universal and accessible to all. This has, in turn, allowed youth to become drivers of social, economic and political change, as they share knowledge, awareness and opinions through online platforms, thereby creating the foundation for a more united world with their universal messages of solidarity.

This panel will demonstrate how these youth driven transcendent online communities overcome challenges posed by international communities to form a unified planetary web-community and sense of belongingness that propagates messages of positive peace online. This allows youth to simultaneously challenge limited perceptions of global cultures and older generations, as they reduce physical geopolitical distances by positively harnessing technology to unite a fragmented world. This interdisciplinary panel will therefore use a largely Anthropological perspective to analyse this sense of belonging and community that youth harbor in order to create a sense of assimilation to bridge global cultures digitally.
Ambivalent Solidarities and Fiscal ReciprocitiesSocieties construct solidarity beyond kin groups via mechanisms of redistribution and reciprocity (Polanyi). The study of taxation hinges on both, but established ethical foundations and practices of implementation are increasingly challenged.economic anthropology, society, state, taxationAcademic Degree: Dr
Name: Chris Hann
Institution / affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology
City: Halle
Country: Germany
Academic Degree: Dr
Name: Lotta Björklund Larsen
Institution / affiliation: Linköping University
City: Linköping
Country: Sweden
Human societies have been constructing social solidarity beyond kin groups for many millennia. States have continuously expanded their capacities to extract resources from their subjects. From whom such revenues are collected and for whose benefit they are used is the outcome of political processes in which considerations of justice and morality are central. The study of taxation therefore engages with multiple key relations: between equity and efficiency; state and market; private property and collective goods; individual and society.
We invite ethnographically informed proposals that address the ethical foundations of taxation policies as they are actually implemented. What is considered fair taxation and notions of who is deserving of support vary greatly. In Scandinavia, strong welfare states were formed on the basis of reciprocity and shared norms of compliance. The bulk of revenue came from taxing individual income in progressive fashion. The state socialism of the Soviet bloc, by contrast, emphasized redistribution via central planning. Individual incomes were more equal and their taxation did not play a significant role. How can postsocialist states replicate the accomplishments of their erstwhile rivals in the West? Or, in the era of neoliberalism, digitization, and experiments with new institutions such as the share economy, is the taxation-based welfare state no longer a viable model even in its former strongholds? What new varieties of state-society-citizen relations formed through taxation might offer alternative forms of solidarity across the boundaries of social class and between different types of taxpayer?
Anthropologists confront the illiberal predicament (Commission on Global Transformations and Marxian Anthropology)Neoliberal globalisation seems to be producing its own neonationalist and illiberal nemesis. What is anthropology contributing in terms of an analysis of illiberalism to those concerned about equality, democracy, global peace and the environment?Authoritarian populism, illiberalism, neoliberal orderAcademic Degree: phd
Name: Don Kalb
Institution / affiliation: University of Bergen
City: Bergen
Country: Norway
Academic Degree: phd
Name: Ida Susser
Institution / affiliation: CUNY
City: New York
Country: USA
Academic Degree: phd
Name: Saygun Gokariksel
Institution / affiliation: Bogazizi University
City: Istanbul
Country: Turkey
Lots has been written about the upsurge of populist and neonationalist politics in the Global North – and parts of the Global South (and Global East). Neoliberal globalization, “dead but dominant” (Neil Smith) a decade ago, is producing its own nemesis in a slow motion collapse. The collapse is not driven by the Left alter-globalism of the early 21stcentury. We see powerful new Right wing forces and illiberal popular developments that appear either repetitions of earlier authoritarian populisms or may look as new hybrid left-right illiberalisms. The collapse is threatening to take established political frameworks, old party systems, and systems of international relations down with it. The EU is fracturing along regional lines and the domestic alliances that have been supportive of it are cracking. Of course, everything is contested fiercely and countercurrents seem at some places to be gaining strength at the same time. Volatility rules.

What has anthropology to offer in terms of analysis, comparison, and intellectual support for those concerned about equality, democracy, global peace and the environment? Which analyses can we offer our colleagues in post socialist Central and Eastern Europe, a region that has been generating some of the most electorally powerful illiberalisms. What can others learn from them? Which role do force fields of capital, class, gender, ethnicity, the nation and religion play in the generation, contestation, and further consolidation of these authoritarian populisms and avowed illiberalisms?
Anthropology in Public Sphere: Solidarity, Peace and DevelopmentIt is based on significant events of present era demonstrate that anthropology has established a new grip in the public sphere—one can make the most of novel forms of communication to reach far beyond the academic activities to distribute knowledge widely and freely.Development, Solidarity, Peace, Public SphereAcademic Degree: Ph. D.
Name: Iswa Chandra Naik
Institution / affiliation: Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha
City: Bhubaneswar
Country: India
Academic Degree: Ph.D
Name: Raghuraman Trichur
Institution / affiliation: California State University
City: Sacramento
Country: USA
Academic Degree: M.A
Name: Dwiti Vikramaditya
Institution / affiliation: Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences
City: Bhubaneswar, Odisha
Country: India
"Anthropology in Public Sphere: Solidarity, Peace and Development” is based on significant events of present era demonstrate that anthropology has established a new grip in the public sphere—one can make the most of novel forms of communication to reach far beyond the academic activities to distribute knowledge widely and freely. This focuses on different contemporary areas of vigorous anthropological research in future that also addressed some of the natural life most extreme problems and issues.

Anthropology believes in a model of development that is more people centric. One that focuses on issues such as environment, poverty, food security, gender, social justice, inclusive growth etc. Such a model, we believe, needs to take culture as an important component of the idea of sustainable development with world solidarity and peace.

Anthropology as a discipline enable the cultivation of certain modes of thinking which will prepare individuals and societies to face these three urgent challenges of the twenty first century: solidarity, peace and development. As a discipline, Anthropology can lend a powerful voice to non–hegemonic and marginalized cultural perspectives on Solidarity, Peace and Development, and thereby lead to more fruitful conversations on the topic.
Anthropology of emotions in South AsiaThis panel answers the need to sketch a broader trajectory of anthropology of emotion in South Asia (on a basis of narratives, findings and arguments) with reference to three key motifs: emotional vulnerability, emotional offense, and politics of emotion and emotional mobilization.emotions, anthropology, South AsiaAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Anna Romanowicz
Institution / affiliation: Jagiellonian University
City: Kraków
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Dev Nath Pathak
Institution / affiliation: South Asian University
City: Delhi
Country: India
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Amiya Kumar Das
Institution / affiliation: Tezpur University
City: Tezpur
Country: India
Our panel is critically inscribed into anthropological traditions of research on emotions as socio-cultural phenomena (such as Rosaldo 1984, 1999), as well as into recent emotional-affective turn in social sciences (Navaro-Yashin 2008, Clough&Halley 2009). Most of the anthropological writings on and from South Asia detail the pivotal presence of emotions. Be it in the frame of right of the passage, ritual performances, or contemporary politics, and social transformations, emotion seems to be an abiding feature. However, there is an imperative to sketch a broader trajectory of anthropology of emotion in South Asia. This could be with reference to three key motifs: emotional vulnerability, emotional offense, and politics of emotion & emotional mobilization. This panel seeks to present narratives, findings, and arguments along the lines of key motifs in order to elucidate and develop an anthropology of emotions, crisscrossing the region of South Asia.
Awry Solidarity – Gellner’s „Nations and Nationalism” revisited [Commission on Theoretical Anthropology]In European Union centrifugal forces are getting stronger and domesticate a significant part of the political scene. They are against European unity and its assumed solidarity. They are also directed toward awry solidarity within national communities. Political borders play here an important role.Gellner, neo-nationalism, EU, awry solidarityAcademic Degree: PhD., CSc.
Name: Petr Skalnik
Institution / affiliation: Politics, University of Hradec Kralove
City: Pardubice
Country: Czechia
Academic Degree: Dr, Dr.hab.
Name: Marcin Brocki
Institution / affiliation: Ethnology, Jagiellonian University
City: Cracow
Country: Poland
In today’s European Union centrifugal forces are getting stronger and domesticate a significant part of the political scene. They are not only against European unity and its assumed solidarity that backed the establishment of the EU, but they are also directed toward an awry solidarity within assumed national communities where political borders play an important role in delineating those communities. Neo-nationalism is the result. The panel will relate Gellner's writings on nationalism with emerging neo-nationalism.
Between solidarities and unsolidarities: coping strategies, material adjustments and consensuses in post-welfare EuropeCoping with the crisis, neoliberalism and austerity policies suggests not only resistance and acts of solidarity but also taking advantage of the deregulation to create new market-based survival strategies. This panel is dedicated to the discussion of the emergence of such neo-hegemonies,unsolidarity, consensus, material adjustments, survival strategiesAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Aliki Angelidou
Institution / affiliation: Panteion University
City: Athens
Country: Greece
Academic Degree: MA
Name: Giorgos Poulimenakos
Institution / affiliation: Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
City: Amsterdam
Country: Netherlands
The recent financial crisis introduced a series of neoliberal reconfigurations which took the form of a widely orchestrated policy paradigm change in Europe where the austerity politics provided a framework for the gradual separation of the states from their responsibility to ensure the well-being of their citizenry. Those developments have in many cases been answered by the people with resistance in the political level (massive demonstrations, new anti-austerity movements etc.) and novel forms of collectively and solidary-managed survival strategies. However, the fact that the waves of social unrest of 2010-2013 seem to have faded today, despite the intensification of the neoliberal adjustments, indicates that there might be another aspect in the contemporary sociopolitical scenery that often remains unexamined by the contemporary anthropological scholarship. This is the aspect of consensus. Therefore, this panel invites us to think, discuss and analyze novel forms of post-welfare capitalist hegemonies. In other words, what this panel asks is how the capitalist relations are reproduced smoothly in the context of the abandonment of the classic schemes of hegemony such as the welfare state. In an age that each one is interpelated as a microenterpreneur responsible for negotiating his/hers existence in individual terms, how does the deregulation of the market provide new tools to certain afflicted social strata to create market-based survival strategies and generate income, status or security, in collaboration with or at the expense of other afflicted groups in a national or transnational level?
Beyond identities? Strategic solidarities in/of the politicalThe panel aims to explore strategic solidarities, which emerge in social movements, initiatives and events of the global contemporary and bring various forms of the political. In this process, conventional identity politics frequently give way to alternative practices of “collective togetherness.”late industrialism, the political, solidarities, collective togetherness, social changeAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Monika Baer
Institution / affiliation: University of Wroclaw
City: Wroclaw
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Anika Keinz
Institution / affiliation: European University Viadrina
City: Frankfurt (Oder)
Country: Germany
The late industrial condition features the entanglements of global and local, government and business, law and politics, nature and science. It embraces various social, cultural, political, economic and technical nested systems, which are all involved in multiple interactions (Fortun 2012). Effectively, the contemporary witnesses specific shifts in social movements, initiatives and events of various historically dispossessed subjects. Identity politics and political aims of formerly precisely defined social groups (e.g. indigenous people, women, the LGBT, workers, ecologists etc.), which for a long time shaped conventional types of activism, have recently given way to alternative political practices. This brought new forms of solidarities emerging at the intersections of previously distinct and (supposedly) distant social and political categories and identities. Thus, the political becomes an arena where more or less stable relations and affinities are being strategically forged to act for specific and elusive ideas of “social change.” In the process, “collective togetherness” of different temporal and spatial scales are being created (Dzenovska, De Genova 2018).



The panel seeks to explore how the above conditionings are being imagined, practiced and experienced in specific movements, initiatives and events all over the world. By means of ethnographically and theoretically informed case studies, it aims to enhance anthropological knowledge on dynamics, which shape the political in various cultural, social, economic and geographical locations as well as individual and collective forms of involvement. In particular, the attention is given to processes in which solidarities are being created and contested while “performing the labour of difference (Fortun 2012).”
Beyond the Politics of Disregard: Charting the Affective Histories of Post/ColonialismWe welcome papers that chart the troubled affective histories of post/colonialism. If disregard and disavowal were integral to the edifice of colonialism – and decolonial love and rage to its dismantling – what is the emotional landscape of our so-called ‘postcolonial’ present?affect, emotions, colonialism, postcolonialism, disregardAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Alexandra Oanca
Institution / affiliation: University of Amsterdam
City: Amsterdam
Country: Netherlands
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Daniela Franca Joffe
Institution / affiliation: University of Hull
City: Hull
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Laura Pozzi
Institution / affiliation: University of Warsaw
City: Warsaw
Country: Poland
This panel proposes a conceptualization of the histories of colonialism and postcolonialism as affective histories, taking affect and emotion as analytical starting points. Emotions are not irrational or solely private phenomena but social processes that can shed light on the socio-structural conditions that produce them.Colonial governance shaped people’s intimate ecologies and was underpinned by a politics of disregard. As Stoler(2009:236) has noted, “disdain, desire, and disaffection for thoughts and things native were basic to the colonial order of things”. Resentment, hate, shame, anger, and fear saturated the lived inequities of colonial relations. Simultaneously, however, these inequities produced transgressive/subversive emotional responses in the form of anger, resilience, courage, and solidarity, which form part of an alternate colonial archive or a politics of “decolonial love” (Sandoval 2000).If disregard and disavowal were integral to the edifice of colonialism, and anger, love and resilience to its dismantling, what are the dispositions and emotions characterizing the so-called ‘postcolonial’ present? We welcome presentations that investigate the silences and omissions at the heart of politics of disregard, which continues to permeate the postcolonial order, whether in policy-making and governance, cultural production and consumption, migration, or tourism encounters.Furthermore, we are interested in examinations of practices and policies that draw on the affective tradition of decolonial love and attempt to go beyond disregard, as a means of combatting coloniality and cultural dominance.We invite papers that chart the troubled emotional landscape of the postcolonial present, without dismissing colonial durabilities or contemporary instances of the neo/colonial present in Europe and beyond.
Beyond-human solidarities. Perceptions, ontologies and interactions with Earth beingsSolidarities beyond humans in a plurality of worlds will be addressed by confronting the ontological compositions and frictions of a variety of fieldworks such as alternative agricultures and spiritualities or rights of nature networks.Ontologies, interactions with non-humans, sensory ethnography, ritual innovation, rights of natureAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Jean Chamel
Institution / affiliation: IHAR, Université de Lausanne
City: Lausanne
Country: Switzerland
Academic Degree: MA
Name: Bertrande Galfré
Institution / affiliation: LESC, Université Paris Nanterre
City: Paris
Country: France
Beyond-human interactions are given a growing interest in anthropology today. While the so-called “ontological turn” has initiated a broad theoretical debate, renovated discourses and practices about “(re)connecting” with “Earth beings” (Cadena 2015) are also emerging, especially in the Western world. In order to ground the discussion on empirical evidences, this panel welcomes contributions that are aiming to explore solidaritiesbeyond humans and within a plurality of worlds, deriving from diverse epistemological and ontological foundations.



A large range of research can feed the reflexion. For instance, research based on phenomenological and sensorial approaches studying modes of relation such as alternative agricultures or composting can refresh ontological discussions. Those can remain sometimes too abstract and encompassing to overcome the schemes they ambition to supersede. Ritual innovation including non-human beings within alternative spiritualities and deep ecological movements is another relevant field of investigation. Also, ethnographical studies around the global movement for the rights of nature reveal the attempt to include new subjects in the realm of law, this “other world” (Hermitte 1999). Contributions that address such cosmopolitics of beyond-human solidarities, through ontological conflicts/frictions (Blaser 2013 ; Landivar & Ramilien 2015, 2017), are especially welcomed.
Building Intercultural Competency towards Global Citizenship: Anthropological insights on Policy and Practice. [Commission on the Anthropology of Public Policy and Development Practice]The present panel seeks anthropological insights and proposals for action on policy and practice that highlight building intercultural competencies for building bridges, recognising rights and, contributing to the understanding and interpretation of citizenship at a global level.Intercultural competency, Global Citizenship, Policy and practiceAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Indrani Mukherjee
Institution / affiliation: University of Delhi
City: New Delhi
Country: India
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Solomon H Katz
Institution / affiliation: University of Pennsylvania
City: Philadelphia
Country: USA
Worldwide economic interdependence and political lobbying has increased transnational social and cultural interconnectedness. This has however brought forth problems and risks in equal measures along with opportunities and possibilities. Collective concerns of peace and compassion, upholding fundamental dignity, human rights and seeking to clarify ethical and moral obligations transcend national and state borders. There are conversations towards opening national borders at one end while at the other one encounters enumerable local uprisings of shunning and othering. The present age of globalisation finds itself in a conundrum of ideating Global citizenship in a multicultural world which is simultaneously struggling to recognise, establish and maintain cultural and ethnic identities.
The year 2018 marks the 70th Anniversary of the UN Declaration of Human Rights. The panel welcomes anthropologist’s perspectives on how far we have reached, and the way forward. A conscious dialogue towards building of intercultural competencies in both policy and practice is imperative in a world order where minorities and marginalised often find themselves in the most disadvantageous position. A recognition of commonalities, socio- cultural interconnections and networks, communication mechanisms as well as possible barriers can go a long way in building bridges, recognising rights and contributing to the understanding and interpretation of citizenship at a global level. The present panel seeks anthropological insights and proposals for action on policy and practice that highlight building intercultural competencies at global, national and local level, with the hope to accumulate positive endeavours from and between various geographies.
Climate Change, Food and Water Security of the Marginalized Communities Globally [Commission on Marginalization and Global Apartheid and Commission on Anthropology and Environment]This panel deals with issues of climate change, scarcity of resources, unequal distribution and the factors that affect these. The issues under the scanner are viewed as multidimensional and complex in character.climate change, food and water security, inequality, marginalizationAcademic Degree: Ph.D
Name: Subhadra Channa
Institution / affiliation: Delhi University
City: Delhi
Country: India
Academic Degree: Ph.D
Name: Joan Mencher
Institution / affiliation: CUNY
City: New York
Country: USA
Academic Degree: Ph.D
Name: Saakshi Joshi
Institution / affiliation: Center for Science and Environment ( CSE)
City: New Delhi
Country: India
Our planet is under several kinds of major threats, including severe climate change and wanton destruction of the natural environment. Globally, there is increasing spread of inequality, along with severe poverty among the marginalized a large part of it due to anthropogenic causes driven by corporate greed and escalating violence. Mere survival for the poor and marginalized is rapidly becoming a critical problem. Potable water is disappearing in many areas of the world, and malnutrition is becoming the norm in some areas. Even within the same community and family there is increasing internal discrimination based on gender, age and other factors, making some people extremely vulnerable. At the macro level, increasing right-wing conservatism is making negative impacts as neoliberal economic policies are spreading. Social/cultural factors and political and economic policies are both threatening the environment and making discrimination increasingly prevalent.

This panel invites papers based on empirical data highlighting these issues and dealing with their complexities such as intersection of gender, race, caste and ethnicity with problems of poverty and livelihood. Papers from the Third World and marginal communities like the indigenous people are especially welcome. Climate change, neo-liberal economic policies and the increasing impact of political conservatism on the environment, poor people and marginal regions of the world need to be highlighted and there is need for a dialogue between those interested in sustainability and a viable future for the coming generations not only of humans but of all species.

Clinical interpretations and ordinary lives: Stories from psychiatric anthropologyInformed by ethnography, this panel explores the diverse ways that psychotherapeutic language and practice shape everyday life, engendering new ways of knowing and perceiving. Focus is on how mental health is ‘done’ and what diagnostic categories ‘do’ in diverse sites around the world.mental health, psychiatry, subjectivity, care, ethnographyAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Anna Witeska-Młynarczyk
Institution / affiliation: University of Warsaw
City: Warsaw
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: China Mills
Institution / affiliation: University of Sheffield/City University London
City: Sheffield/London
Country: United Kingdom
This panel is an immersion in sensitive ethnographies that document contemporary engagements with mental health services and systems, psychiatric discourses, and therapeutic practices around the world. Writing about Iran, Orkideh Behrouzan (2016) draws attention to how the normalization of the psychiatric vernacular has engendered new ways of knowing, interpreting, and perceiving oneself and others in the world. A growing literature shows how nuanced ethnographies can illuminate local ‘ecologies of suffering’ (Jadhav et al, 2015:13) that can be used to inform and question constructions of mental health as global (Jain and Orr, 2016).

Engaging with this, the panel will focus on specific ways that the psychotherapeutic language and practice penetrate the everyday life of people grappling not only with mental distress but also with the external ambiguities of how mental health and its ‘treatments’ are understood in their, and others’, societies.

We aim to foreground the voices of variously situated actors who (struggle to) make sense of different mental states (their own and those experienced by others) against a landscape where mental health is positioned as global. We are interested in the stories of those who are engaged in ‘doing’ mental health through the ‘tinkering’ of acts of care (Moser, Mol 2010) – in clinics, homes, community centres, schools, centres for elderly people , primary care settings, and more. Focus is on how mental health is ‘done’ and what diagnostic categories ‘do’ (Mills and Hilberg, in press) in diverse sites around the world.
Competing environmentalist discourses and language of solidarity [IUAES Commission for Linguistic Anthropology and IUAES Commission: Anthropology and the Environment]This panel invites papers on original and empirically based case studies of the language and discourse involved in the discussion of environmental and ecological issues, and interrogate how language is employed to argue for and propagate selected positions on the growing ecological crisis.environment, discourse, ecolinguistics, solidarityAcademic Degree: Professor, PhD
Name: Anita Sujoldžić
Institution / affiliation: Institute for Anthropological Research
City: Zagreb
Country: Croatia
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Olga Orlić
Institution / affiliation: Institute for Anthropological Research
City: Zagreb
Country: Croatia
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Saša Poljak Istenič
Institution / affiliation: Slovenia Sections Library of the Institute of Slovenian Ethnology Institute of Slovenian Ethnology
City: Ljubljana
Country: Slovenia
Given the complexity of contemporary environmental crises, the need to increase environmental awareness over the last decades has led to the progressive presence of competing environmental discourses in both academy and public. Many environmental general concepts are well-known, however they are often used in a haphazard way, while ways in which environmental problems are interpreted and solutions proposed at the environment/ development interface lack consistency. A recent integrational/ecological field of ecolinguistics has a great potential for contributing to trans-disciplinary collaborations among environmental research and environmental communication as it considers a wide range of oppressed groups (e.g. including animals and current generations of humans who are suffering from pollution and resource depletion), and considers the impact of discourses on the wider systems that support life. This panel invites papers that aim to reconsider various discourses, both synchronically and diachronically through original and empirically based case studies of the language and discourse involved in the discussion of environmental and ecological issues, and interrogate how, in the media, corporate and activist circles, language is employed to argue for and propagate selected positions on the growing ecological crisis. Along with criticising the destructive impact of discourses such as advertising or economics, or detecting ambivalent discourses such as eco-tourism, sustainability or greenwash, particularly welcome are papers using positive discourse analysis of new social and environmental movements, such as those that advocate food sovereignty or solidarity economy, that might provide understanding of how change happens, for the better, across a range of environmental issues.
Comrades Solidarity. Eastern European Countries Mutual Aid in XX CenturyThe solidarity between nations was an important part of the Soviet and Yugoslav policy and propaganda. The panel’s aim is to explore forms and cases of mutual aid between Eastern Bloc countries; its reasons: political, ideological, social as well as reactions on (imposed?) brotherhood relations.solidarity, Eastern Europe, ideologyAcademic Degree: Professor
Name: Ljupco Risteski
Institution / affiliation: Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology, "Ss.Cyril and Methodius" University in Skopje
City: Skopje
Country: Macedonia
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Anna Kurpiel
Institution / affiliation: Willy Bramdt Centre for German and European Studies University of Wroclaw
City: Wroclaw
Country: Poland
End of World War II for many decades divided Europe into two ideological camps. The iron curtain cut away half of the continent, limiting contacts between East and West. New Cold War Paradigm simplified the world, divided it into underdeveloped communist countries and wealthy liberal states. The question of relations between East and West dominated the political, social and academic discourses overshadowing mutual contacts between Eastern countries.
The solidarity and brotherhood between nations were one of the leading topics of the Soviet and Yugoslavian policy and propaganda. However, the “comrades solidarity”, empowering the homogeneous image of Eastern European countries, was not only a part of the ideology but also internal and external politics and economy of each of the nations, depending on the mutual relations between communist parties and the general political situation.
The mutual aid was coming also from and to common people, with belief in shared “brotherhood” fate or feeling of unity in the situation of a constant deficit of goods.
This panel has the following objectives:
a) To explore forms and cases of mutual aid and solidarity between countries and people from the Eastern Block;
b) To determine the reasons for mutual aid between communist parties: political, ideological and other;
c) To investigate bottom-up, quotidian forms of solidarities between people;
d) To examine the factors that influenced the image of “brotherhood” between Eastern European countries (political, economic or social);
e) To explore social reactions on mutual aid and/ or propaganda of (imposed) “solidarity”.
Connecting people through sports (Commission on the Anthropology of Sports)This panel will discuss as opposite values such as "solidarity"/"rivalry" and "connection"/"individualism" can be analyzed through sportive practices and events, focusing primarily on the political dimension of the sports.sports; solidarities; identities; politics; comparatism.Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Luiz Rojo
Institution / affiliation: Universidade Federal Fluminense
City: Niterói
Country: Brazil
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Jérôme Soldani
Institution / affiliation: Universite Paul Vallery
City: Montpellier
Country: France
Sports has been, currently and thorough its history from the 19th century, an arena where people are simultaneously connected and isolated, exercise their solidarity and fighting for their supremacy. Many groups and individuals use sportive practices and events in order to improve their visibility, to claim their identities, and to share experiences through the world. Not only a place of confrontations, sports also connect people from different backgrounds and create new networks. In an environment of competitions and rivalry, sport practitioners sharing some goals, constraints, and sense of solidarity (between teammates, for example) can become a community of practice, in a short or long term. How do people and groups build their identities and networks through sportive events and practices? How dimensions of competitions and solidarities in sports are articulated by individuals and groups, spectators and practitioners, to create new kinds of communities? Did an Anthropology of sports can allow a new understanding of the concept of "relationship"? In this panel, our aim is also to create a place where the concepts of "solidarity" and "connection" can be articulated in two different ways among scholars. In the first sense, by connecting researches from different countries and theoretical perspectives, in a possible more collective and comparative studies. In the second sense, focusing primarily on the political dimension of sportive practices, connecting different areas (gender, identities, and others) of interest of the Anthropology of Sports, around a common theme.
Constructing Solidarities through Historical TracesThis panel explores the relationships between historical traces and solidarities. We ask what kind of solidarities are afforded or hindered by the idea of trace. How are forms of solidarity produced through encounters with trace? What forms of sociality are bridged? Which ones are torn apart?trace history memory material cultureAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Magdalena Buchczyk
Institution / affiliation: Humboldt University
City: Berlin
Country: Germany
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Zahira Aragüete-Toribio
Institution / affiliation: University of Geneva
City: Geneva
Country: Switzerland
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Aimee Joyce
Institution / affiliation: University of St Andrews
City: St Andrews
Country: United Kingdom
Solidarity is seen as a concept that bridges “diverse modes of practice, forms of sociality and mechanisms of envisioning future prospects for people's lives” (Rakopoulos 2016). This panel explores the complex relationships between historical traces and solidarities. Drawing from a range of traces including landscapes, material culture and bodies, we ask what kind of solidarities are afforded or hindered by the concept of trace.

We see traces as knots of history with an ambiguous auratic presence, located between forgetting and memory, repression and amplification, metonymy and forgetting (Napolitano 2015). What kind of solidarities are made possible by the existence of traces? How productive are traces in enabling diverse practices of solidarity? What forms of sociality are bridged by traces and which ones are torn apart? How are forms of solidarity produced through encounters with trace? In what ways, are these “intimate” or kinship solidarities, or perhaps ones aligned to the nation state (Herzfeld 2016)? What are the points of tension or discord generated by particular solidarities? How are traces experienced and performed as part of future-making exercises? The panel invites speakers with a range of ethnographic material, including anthropologies of history, state, religion as well as museum and material culture.

References:
Herzfeld, M. (2016). The Intimate Solidarities of Religion in the City. History and Anthropology, 27(3), 265-272.
Napolitano, V. (2015). Anthropology and traces. Anthropological Theory, 15(1), 47-67.
Rakopoulos, T. (2016). Solidarity: the egalitarian tensions of a bridge‐concept. Social Anthropology, 24(2), 142-151.
Contextualizing Human Rights to Rights of Marginalized Categories of the World with Special emphasis on Women’s Rights [ Commission on Marginalization and Global Apartheid and International Women’s Anthropological Conference ]This panel will interrogate the relationship between how human rights are conceptualized and imagined and how they are implemented, looking specifically on the intersection with marginalization and inequality with special focus on women’s rights.Human Rights, Marginalization, Intersection, Patriarchy, Women’s RightsAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: RAGINI SAHAI
Institution / affiliation: Amity University A unit of Rinand Baldev Education Foundation
City: Uttar Pradesh
Country: India
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: SUZANNE HANCHETT
Institution / affiliation: International Women Anthropology Conference (IWAC)
City: New York
Country: USA
Human Rights are viewed in international law and discourse as universally applicable to all humans, but paradoxically the definition of who is human varies in different contexts. Racism, Sexism, Xenophobia, and other social marginalization processes deny the very humanity of “others.” At crucial historical moments, many kinds of domination and violence have been justified thus. Under the most liberal political context of the Enlightenment, natives of colonized continents were denied even the most basic of rights because they were not considered as fully human. To this day children are torn from their parents, women are raped, people are starved and tortured, livelihoods torn away all because – it is said -- the victims are not human enough to be granted even the most basic human rights.
Women’s human rights are regularly contested and denied, with women of socially marginal social groups suffering from the intersection of patriarchal and class or caste disadvantages. For the female half of humanity, however, the glass is still half full: no matter what, women are still struggling and in every context to assert their identity as fully human. As women gain some voice it is becoming more and more apparent that the most basic of human rights, the right of survival, for many comes at a psychological and physical price.
In this panel we invite papers that deal with issues confronting people of socially marginal or low status categories based on “race,” ethnicity, sexuality, religion, gender or any other criterion.
Continuity and change in land tenure system of South AsiaTo discuss key changes and continuity in land tenure system, land policy and governance in South Asia.tenure, sub-tenure, customary, colonial, postcolonial, stateAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Hari Charan Behera
Institution / affiliation: Indian Statistical Institute
City: Giridih, Jharkhand
Country: India
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Ajit Kumar Behura
Institution / affiliation: Indian Institute of Technology (IIT-ISM)
City: Dhanbad
Country: India
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Muhammad Ala Uddin
Institution / affiliation: University of Chittagong
City: Chittagong
Country: Bangladesh
Land tenure system is more or less similar but complex among the South Asian countries. Apart from three major tenure systems such as zamindari, raiyatwari and mahalwari systems there were a large number of sub-tenures established during the British administration in the Indian subcontinent. These tenures and sub-tenures were deeply ingrained with culture, social and economic values, and ideologies of the state. The colonial land policy and land tenure system has undergone changes with new constitutional framework after independence. The nations and states have framed new set of land policies or they have inherited basic legal and structural framework from the colonial land policies. Some states have recognised customary land tenure practice and the other states have failed to do so. In some states there are good land governance practices and some other states are facing key governance challenges. South Asian nations share many similarities and differences with respect to the land tenure system. The transition has not be always smooth but with conflict and resistance.
In view of above, the followings are the objectives and themes of the session Culture and land tenure
Colonial root of land tenure system in South Asia
Changing tenure system in South Asia
Land tenures in hill regions and plateaus
Customary and statutory land tenure system
Customary practice in the tribal areas
Tenancy issues in South Asia
Property rights and gender
Religious rights and authority over land
Common property resource management
Public land management
Any other relevant issue related to land tenure
Crime as Solidarity: Youth Marginality, Youth Violence and Youth in PrisonViolence suffered and perpetrated by young citizens has reached unprecedented levels. The panel seeks to discuss the different aspects of youth violence, youth marginality and youth custody, both as expression of youth culture and relating them to present forms of governance and youth “control”.youth, violence, gangs, imprisonmentAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Peter Anton Zoettl
Institution / affiliation: CRIA-UMinho
City: Braga
Country: Portugal
Academic Degree: Master
Name: Redy Wilson Lima
Institution / affiliation: CICS.NOVA
City: Praia
Country: Cape Verde
Violence suffered and perpetrated by young citizens from the sociospaces of the late liberal urban periphery has reached unprecedented levels in many countries around the globe. In Brazil, for instance, amongst juveniles aged 16 or 17 years of age, homicides account for near half of all deaths registered, and the juvenile prison population has doubled along the last decade. Like in Brazil, in many countries prison has become a second “home” to many growing up citizens. Although the rise of the world prison population has been linked to punitivist neoliberal strategies of governance and control, particularly juvenile offending may also be understood as form of conscious marginal resistance to dominant modes of being and living. In a number of capital cities of all continents, youth gangs dedicate themselves not only to illegal activities, but often also represent communal expressions of youth culture. Within the prison system, juveniles regularly count on networks of solidarity from fellow prisoners of their neighbourhoods. The panel seeks to discuss the different aspects of youth violence, youth marginality and youth custody, both as expression of youth culture and relating them to present forms of governance and youth “control”.
Critical Issues in the Anthropology of Risk and Disaster 2 [Commission on Risk and Disaster]In recent years anthropology has become a major contributor to the understanding of risk and disaster. Continuing from 2018, this panel explores the scope of the anthropological involvement in the subject of risk and disaster and act as a review of the many topics and concerns in the field.Disaster, risk, vulnerability, displacement, climateAcademic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Susanna Hoffman
Institution / affiliation: Hoffman Consulting
City: Telluride
Country: USA
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Virginia Garcia-Acosta
Institution / affiliation: CIESAS
City: Mexico City
Country: Mexico
For the IUAES Inter-Congress of 2019, we continue our discussion of the critical issues in the anthropology of risk and disaster begun in Florianopolis. As noted before, in recent years anthropology has become a major contributor to the understanding of risk and disaster. Meanwhile, all sorts of major calamitous events have occurred or loom immanent, impacting every larger numbers of people. As the global situation has become increasingly perilous, so have the matters that have risen to anthropological concern. This panel once again explores the scope of our involvement in both subject and actuality of risk and disaster and serves to review topics, situations, and understandings. These include: the increase in disaster events, vulnerability, and driving factors; the gap between what is known and what enters policy and practice; climate change and its impacts; the expansion of nation state and NGO involvement; risk reduction and risk creation efforts and obstacles, including effects of development, urbanization, coastalization, and neo-liberal exploitation; the expanding displacement and resettlement of people; ideology, symbolism, memorials, and all other social cultural factors encompassed. The panel is open to a wide variety of contributions on different topics and coming from different regions of the world.
Critiques of Political Economy and Alternative Global Futures: Moral Economy, Moral Sociology and Spiritual EcologyThe Panel explores some challenges of rethinking and transformations and seeks to further dialogues with moral economy, moral sociology and spiritual ecology for going beyond the ravages of the present and for alternative global futuresPolitical economy, moral economy, moral ecologyAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Ananta Kumar Giri
Institution / affiliation: Madras Institute of Development Studies
City: Tamil Nadu
Country: India
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Abdulkadir Osman Farah
Institution / affiliation: Aalborg University - Denmark
City: Aalborg
Country: Denmark
The panel focuses the following main points:

-Genealogies of Political Economy as a Critical Perspective: A Critical History and Struggle for Alternative Futures -Limits and Possibilities of Critiques of Political Economy: From Marx to Picketty
-Critique of Political Economy and the Calling of Ecology: Limits of Production, Consumption and Paths of Biological and Cultural Regenereration
-With and Beyond Critiques of Political Economy: Moral Economy, Moral Sociology and Spiritual Ecology
-Dimensions of Moral Economy: From Aristotle to Sahlins (Marshall Sahlins, The Stone Age Economics), Mauss (Marcel Mauss, Gift), Gandhi and Kumarappa
-Moral Sociology
-Spiritual Ecology
Cultural Identity and Technological PrivacyEducational Technology companies have established a global presence in education systems. Their programs run on a controversial set of inputs comprised of student data. Perceptions and policies of student data privacy may be linked to the cultural identities of EdTech users and schools.Cultural Identity, Technological Privacy, Educational Technology, Student data privacyAcademic Degree: Masters
Name: Amanda Potasznik
Institution / affiliation: University of Massachusetts, Boston
City: Boston
Country: USA
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Wenfan Yan
Institution / affiliation: Beijing Normal University
City: Beijing
Country: China
The cost/benefit analysis of free to use educational technology almost always results in EdTech adoption, since the benefits often come at no financial cost to the school or learner. However, privacy advocates have pointed out that users still “pay” for free EdTech programs; not with money, but with their information. This consideration for student and teacher data privacy has generated various policy changes and updates to student privacy laws across several countries. However, users in those same countries might see no issue with providing personal data in exchange for valuable programs, and not all countries have deemed such an exchange controversial. It is clear that cultural identity may influence perceptions and policies regarding student data privacy.

Identity is an important idea in many disciplines. Anthropology, education, sociology, technology and other fields have highlighted national identities, ethnological identities, ethnic identities, cultural identities, social identities and self-identities. The current cross-culture and interdisciplinary identity research has demonstrated an interdisciplinary trend. Our panel discussion will focus on critical themes based on current cross culture and interdisciplinary identity research.

The panel will discuss the relationship between identities and technology. Through the study of the relationship between these factors, we can explore the impacts and influences of technology on the identity. Both micro-qualitative research and macro-quantitative research findings will be discussed. Our panel will use the two critical themes mentioned above to generate intriguing conversations surrounding these issues. We are looking forward to new understandings of identity and technology privacy.
Culture and Biology of Indigenous PeopleThe panel focuses on the results of interdisciplinary research on fertility, mortality, body size, health and nutrition status of various ethnic groups in the cultural context. We want the session to be a challenge for researchers focusing on various aspects of human biology and demography.Body size, fertility, morbidity, mortality, nutrition, diseases, age at menarcheAcademic Degree: Ph.D., Sc.D. (dr hab.)
Name: Grażyna Liczbińska
Institution / affiliation: Department: Faculty of Biology, Institution: Institute of Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University
City: Poznań
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: Professor Dr.
Name: Rajesh K. Gautam
Institution / affiliation: Department of Anthropology Dr. Harisingh Gour Vishwavidyalaya (A Central University)
City: Sagar
Country: India
Indigenous people or tribal/ ethnic minorities constitute a large percentage of global population. They have a historical background and identity, independent of the countries within the boundaries of which they are located. On the one hand, many of such indigenous populations can suffer from malnutrition, high morbidity and mortality. Moreover, some ethnic populations are burdened with certain genetic disorders, such as sickle cell haemoglobin or thalassemia. Poverty, illiteracy, poor nutrition and low health awareness contribute to their poor health status. Little do we know about beliefs, customs and practices of indigenous people in relation to health and disease, and the manner in which their way of life affects health status.
On the other hand, studies have highlighted changes in the style and quality of life in indigenous populations, especially the ones from the developing world. In many countries of Europe, Asia and America the economic situation of tribal people has changed along with economic and social transformations. The indigenous groups respond to them by the rising morbidity and mortality rates due to infectious diseases and non-communicable diseases (including obesity, diabetes or hypertension). The epidemiological and demographic transitions are caused by urbanized lifestyle, unhealthy dietary practices and increasingly common sedentary lifestyle.
The panel we propose seeks to create a platform for sharing results of interdisciplinary research, concerning changes in fertility, mortality, body size (height, weight and BMI), age at menarche, health and nutrition status over time, setting them in the broadly understood cultural context.
Customary laws in natural resource management and sustainable development: issues and challenges for indigenous communities in AsiaSustainability in natural resource management has been a political norm, assisted by the dominant jurisprudence of the states. It raises the question that does statutory law works efficiently to carry forward development or customary laws can be alternatives.customary law, sustainable development, indigenousAcademic Degree: Ph.D
Name: DEBENDRA BISWAL
Institution / affiliation: CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF JHARKHAND
City: RANCHI
Country: India
Academic Degree: Ph.D
Name: JOAO DANTAS
Institution / affiliation: FEDERAL UNIVERSITY OF SERGIPE
City: Sao Christovao
Country: Brazil
Academic Degree: PRE PH.D.
Name: ABEL POLESE
Institution / affiliation: TALLIN UNIVERSITY
City: Tallinn
Country: Estonia
Dispossession of traditional lands and natural resources is one of the major problems of the indigenous/tribal peoples all over the world. Very recently, the Millennium Development Goals, Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) Act and several regional and thematic workshops have realised that the security of rights to territories, lands and natural resources of the indigenous/tribal communities is the most powerful indicator relevant to indigenous people’s well-being and sustainable development. A global synthesis report on Indicators of Indigenous Peoples’ Well-being, Poverty and Sustainability was submitted to the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in 2008. It stressed that the process of dispossession has been going on for centuries, first as a result of the intrusion of colonial systems and the ever growing search for rich agricultural areas and natural wealth; today, as a result of development policies and globalization. The positivist school of legal jurisprudence along with market oriented economist argue that the rule of law having organized government and legal commands guarantees private property rights in the modern state societies and governance. contrary to it, the empirical/anthropological findings on cases for and against the public production of law and enforcement from the primitive legal systems are questioning; the legal positivists because they apparently represent examples of law and order without a state government and economists who assume that the state must establish and enforce private property rights. This panel tries to explore instances of conflict between customary/depoliticised laws of indigenous communities and the politicised/provincial laws of the modern state worldwide.
Deconstructing Race: Biological or Social Concept?This panel brings together international biological and cultural anthropologists to explore the meaning of ‘race’ and its impact on science and society.race concept, human variation, race and racismAcademic Degree: PhD, DSc
Name: Katarzyna A. Kaszycka
Institution / affiliation: Institute of Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University
City: Poznan
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Rachel Caspari
Institution / affiliation: Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work, Central Michigan University
City: Mt. Pleasant
Country: USA
Race as a scientific concept arose in Europe in the eighteenth century, with the idea that humans can be subdivided into groups (subspecies) based on a set of morphological features and common geographic origin.
Since the 1960s, an increasing number of anthropologists, especially in the United States, have successfully argued that biological race does not exist and emphasized that race is a socio-cultural construct. However, implicit assumptions of the race concept have not been eradicated. Moreover, in the current political climate, we are seeing the rise of nationalism and associated racial narratives that explicitly biologize social groups and construct geographic variation racially. Recently, some scientists have supported this narrative by publicly asserting that biological differences between human groups is evidence of the existence of race.
This is an important time for anthropologists to work together, across sub-disciplines, to engage with race and we think this special IUAES Inter-Congress is an ideal venue. This panel will emphasize changes in the meaning of ‘race’ over time, paying special attention to the concept of race in modern research. The panel will bring together international scholars of biological and cultural anthropology to explore ways to develop and promote a shared anthropological perspective on race and human diversity. We will address both the resurgence of the race concept itself in science and society, and also the effects that the implicit assumptions of race have on the production of knowledge in anthropology.
Discordant Solidarities: Exorcizing and Channelling Ghosts of Hegemonic DominanceIn light of the ways nationalist reawakenings equate remembering history with valorizing discord, this panel invites papers on “ghostly” beings, “haunted” places, and living-dead ideologies as material with which remembering can reproduce and resist the inhumane in moral orders.History, Ghosts, Discord, Solidarities, MoralityAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Brackette F Williams
Institution / affiliation: University of Arizona/School of Anthropology
City: Tucson, Arizona
Country: USA
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Marcelo Moura Mello
Institution / affiliation: Federal University
City: Porto Alegre
Country: Brazil
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Diane Austin-Broos
Institution / affiliation: University of Sydney
City: Sydney
Country: Australia
On the eve of WWI, in The Life of Reason (1905), poet-philosopher, George Santayana declared that “Those who do not remember the past are doomed to repeat it”. With the smell of WWII still in the air, in Requiem for a Nun (19951), novelist William Faulkner made a character conclude that “The past is never dead. It’s not even past”. In a period of reawakening nationalism, both quotes often become part of injunctions to return to history as cultural heritage, in defiance of earlier, unsuccessful attempts to drive a stake through the hearts of colonialism, nationalism, racism and sexism. In the light of these perennial failures, “ghost” and “ghostly” increasingly serve as analytic constructs for undead, haunted spaces of identity commitment. Proliferating remembrances of diverse, complex, competing sufferings – for example, in racial, ethnic and gendered discriminations - valorize solidarities intended to dismember the hegemonic national. These attempts, however, often serve instead only to reproduce solidarities as discord that also bear the same and new inhumane potentialities. This panel invites papers to consider: 1) “ghost” and “ghostly” as referents for the discord embedded in making solidarities; 2) ethnographic accounts of the haunted places and undead beings that inform the present, motivating conflicts and/or shaping resolutions; and 3) ideologies that, like Succubus and Ghost Rider, can promote solidarity as discord and valorize the capacity to reproduce inhumane moral orders.
Disillusions in aspirations for national and regional integration in Eastern AfricaThis panel will explore the tensions in the cultural space, which impede the solidifying of national and regional integration, cascading from micro-level perspectives on common identity and solidarity.cultural space, exclusion, national integration, regional integration, Eastern AfricaAcademic Degree: PhD ( Anthrop)
Name: Benson Azariah MULEMI
Institution / affiliation: The Catholic University of Eastern Africa
City: Nairobi
Country: Kenya
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Alexander MECKELBURG
Institution / affiliation: University of Hamburg; Hiob-Ludolf Centre for Ethiopian Studies
City: Hamburg
Country: Germany
The development of nation states as the basis for regional integration and cooperation is characterised by both stability and discontinuities, explained within conceptual frameworks of post-colonial politics, nation building and global economics. However, attempts at fostering nation and regional solidarities wax and wane perpetually. The failure in forging national and regional solidarity and integration revolve around weak or absent national and regional functions, persisting exclusive socio-economic enclaves, unequal distribution of common identity benefits, fragile inter- and intra-governmental structures and contradictory opinion of leading actors. Political analyses pay little attention to holistic ethnological perspectives on the connections and disconnections in the discourse on ethnic nationalism, and national and regional integration. In what ways are national and regional integration a sociocultural process for understanding failures and nurturing solidarities for authentic national and regional integration in Eastern Africa? How does the anticipated effect of integration processes on daily lives and fear of obliteration of national and local traditions and cultural expressions affect the aspirations for national and regional integration? This panel will explore the tensions in the cultural space, which impede the solidifying of national and regional integration, cascading from micro-level perspectives on common identity and solidarity. Paper proposals on intra-state ethnological issues and their implications for national and regional integration in Eastern Africa will be considered. The focus will be, but not limited to exploration of adversarial ethnocentrism and socioeconomic exclusion, ethno-ecological units that define socioeconomic structures and the politics of indigeneity, belonging, inclusion and solidarity in regional communities in East Africa.
Enterprise Anthropology: Risk Perception and Management in Business ContextsThis panel aims to discuss how risks in technological operation, control systems and social interactions are perceived and managed in different business contexts as companies strive to provide not only reliable goods and services, but also new regimes of value and information.Enterprise Anthropology, Business, Risks, Management,Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Keiko Yamaki
Institution / affiliation: Shujitsu University
City: Okayama
Country: Japan
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Maria Yotova
Institution / affiliation: Ritsumei University
City: Kyoto
Country: Japan
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Tomoko Hamada
Institution / affiliation: The College of William & Mary
City: Virginia
Country: USA
This panel aims to discuss how risks in technological operation, control systems and social interactions are perceived and managed in different business contexts as companies strive to provide not only reliable goods and services, but also new regimes of value and information.
Companies in contemporary society are part of global networks that circulate products, information, value, and even authority around the world. The complexity of these networks and the interaction between numerous (and often multi-cultural) actors can become a source of risk and anxiety in daily work and lives of organizations. As business in itself is a series of conflicts and compromises, it also involves complex negotiations of power and authority within specific corporate culture. Thus, in some cases the allocation of risk and responsibility may become not only an issue of technological standards and operation, but also of social values and trust in the business organization. This panel pays attention to the factors that pose risk to companies in different business contexts and discusses the ways companies are trying to deal with it.
Ethnographic Encounters on African Youth and Families: Norms, Education, Employment, and MarginalizationIn contemporary Africa, there has been constant socio-economic change in different areas of social life. How have these changes shaped the positioning of youth? We shall focus on youth life courses, and associated gender, education, employment, and population growth by examining ethnographic cases.Youth, Africa, family, social change, genderAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Wakana Shiino
Institution / affiliation: Tokyo University of Foreign Studies
City: Fuchu-shi
Country: Japan
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Peter Atekyereza
Institution / affiliation: Makerere University
City: Kampala
Country: Uganda
In pre-colonial traditional African societies, male young people were expected and prepared to defend and fight for the community. The “Masai Moran warriors", for example, was a categorical regiment of the Masai society. Women on the other hand were expected and groomed to do daily domestic labour for their families until marriage when they were expected to give birth to children.

With modernization and globalization, some values have been abandoned and others mixed or swallowed by a wave of the capitalist monetary economy, and the youth life course is drastically changing. In recent years, many African nations have increasingly started to have education as a pillar of modernization strategy and societal determinant. Today, there is no opportunity for gainful employment without academic background. The pressure on parents and kins to educate children is getting heavier. Despite remarkable economic growth in most African countries, economic disparities are increasing. Even with good educational background, there is a strong system, tracing to the traditional kinships, controlling employability. Between family expectations and reality, many young people are lost in systematic integration.

In this panel, we share this basic overview of contemporary Africa, and we will focus on the way youth life course, as well as associated gender, norms, education, employment, population growth issues through examining ethnographic cases in Africa. We would like to analyze and discuss the relationships between the realities of youth and their families (societies) as well.
Ethnographic Encounters with Reductionism and Essentialism [Commission on Marginalization and Global Apartheid]In this panel we propose to explore different ethnographic cases, draw comparisons and construct theoretical framings, that advance our understanding of the role of essentialism and reductionism in people’s lives.Reductionism, Essentialism, Ethnography, Identity PoliticsAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Jonatan Kurzwelly
Institution / affiliation: University of the Free State
City: Bloemfontein
Country: Republic of South Africa
Academic Degree: Professor
Name: Subhadra Channa
Institution / affiliation: University of Delhi
City: Delhi
Country: India
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Marie Wallace
Institution / affiliation: Arizona State University
City: Phoenix
Country: USA
The study of different types of othering is one of the central themes in Anthropology that gained a new sense of urgency. Within the current global rise of populist politics, which systematically preys on essentialist and reductionist representations of the social world, our scholarship couldn’t be more relevant. Ethnographic methods are well suited to study and contest such dangerous narratives, as they both allow for a contextual understanding of the uses and meanings of essentialism and reductionism, while at the same time uncovering the diversity and plurality of human life that escapes any simplistic categorisations. In this panel we propose to explore different ethnographic cases, draw comparisons and construct theoretical framings, that advance our understanding of the role of essentialism and reductionism in people’s lives. We are interested in both politicised and quotidian narratives, actions and projects which are based on reductionist or essentialist assumptions about individuals or groups of people.
Evoking the intangible. Sensory media, anthropological film and art-based practice in engagements with epistemically challenging phenomena.Developments in anthropological theory, new sensory media technologies and forms of creative and collaborative practice anthropologists increasingly embrace, allow for rethinking the potential of alternative methods to evoking more elusive aspects of the lived-experience of others.visual anthropology, art, intangible, invisibleAcademic Degree: Dr
Name: Jan Lorenz
Institution / affiliation: Adam Mickiewicz Univeristy
City: Poznań
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: Dr
Name: Piotr Goldstein
Institution / affiliation: Trinity College Dublin
City: Dublin
Country: Ireland
Recent decades brought a surge of methodological experiments in anthropology: challenging or reinventing the formula of ethnographic film, embracing the creative possibilities of sensory media, and combining anthropology with art in fusions of creative practice, performance and ethnographic research. Interrelated circumstances necessitate such turn to alternative means of evoking and representing lived realties. For once, paradigmatic shifts in anthropological theory grasping at alternative modalities of being call for renewed encounters with topics that seemed to have been analytically tamed and foreclosed. Second, the need for ontological reframing called upon by acknowledging human and non-human lives in the anthropocene or its imminent wake. Third, the surge in technological developments that prompt existential questions about sentience, subjectivity and agency and ways in which these can be addressed anthropologically.
The above description does not foreclose the range of challenges we must face and the means we can face them by employing non-textual or hybrid media. This panel welcomes anthropologists who seek or invent new methods and forms of engagement, contemporary artists and filmmakers drawn to anthropology, and those who operate across and beyond these disciplinary realms and question their boundaries.
Exploring Southern solidaritiesThis panel explores interspecies, interethnic and other cases of solidarity - their networks, actors and the values they put in action . We wish to interrogate the eventual singularity of or novelties brought by these social experiences in the Global South and, in particular, Latin America.Global South, Latin America, mutual aid, cross-boundary solidaritiesAcademic Degree: Dr
Name: Nádia Farage
Institution / affiliation: Dept of History/ Institute of Philosophy and Human Sciences/ University of Campinas
City: Campinas, SP
Country: Brazil
Academic Degree: Dr
Name: Lisa Grund
Institution / affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
City: Nijmegen
Country: Netherlands
This panel contemplates historical and contemporary experiences of solidarity in Southern contexts.
A current definition of solidarity springs from notions of common interest or intra group support. However, we owe to P.Kropotkin a notion of solidarity strongly tied up to the concept of mutual aid, which means, above of all, solidarity between diverse and even opposite groups of interest. For Kropotkin, as well as for Rousseau, in his definition of pitié, the shared ground for solidarity is the most encompassing category of sentient life. Taking up the kropotkinian challenge, our debate will take into account historical and contemporary situations when solidarity was or is established among distinctive categories or groups. In this vein, we will be discussing solidarities established across boundaries, be they interspecies, interethnic, intercultural, as well as other forms of solidarity, in order to explore their actors, networks and the values they put in action. Departing from ethnography, this panel will interrogate eventual singularities of or novelties brought by these social experiences in the Global South and, in particular, Latin America.

Food Solidarity: Moral economies of food production and consumption as a foundation for human and environmental security [Commission on Anthropology and Environment & International Commission on the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition]To address an emerging global food supply crisis, concepts such as ‘food sovereignty’, ‘the right to food’ or ‘sustainable production and consumption’ signify a struggle to promote stricter normative standards and positive systemic outcomes. We invite papers on social and ecological food justice.food, sustainability, social justiceAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Thomas Reuter
Institution / affiliation: University of Melbourne
City: Melbourne
Country: Australia
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Frédéric Duhart
Institution / affiliation: Universidad Intercultural del Estado de Puebla
City: Huehuetla
Country: Mexico
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Xavier Medina
Institution / affiliation: Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
City: Barcelona
Country: Spain
Food is emerging as a conflicted field in the wake of an emerging global supply crisis. World hunger has been increasing again in recent years due to climate change impacts and conflict, leading to predictions of mass migration. Different concepts such as ‘food security’, ‘food sovereignty’, ‘the human right to food’, ‘sustainable food production’, ‘sustainable food consumption,’ and ‘the rights of animals’ all are part of a struggle to promote stricter normative standards and to develop policies that meet these standards so as to achieve sustained positive outcomes at a systemic level. This is difficult to reconcile with a contemporary global market economy that shows an increasing regulatory and normative deficit, or with the agricultural and social policies of nation states caught up in outdated, modernist ideas of development and webs of vested interest. Recently, emerging normative concepts also have started to question the right of individuals and communities to eat any kind of food they want.
This panel invites contributions illustrating the importance of normative discourses of social and ecological justice and solidarity that are applied in the context of agriculture, food distribution and consumption. Papers on sustainable agricultures and diets, farmers and food movements, or environmental activism around food would be of particular interests, but also studies on global initiatives seeking to produce food solidarity in the face of a looming crisis.
From the Horn of Africa to Communist Eastern Europe: Academic Exchange, Solidarities and MemoryAfter the 1950s, the Horn of Africa developed new relations with Eastern Europe. We explore solidarities developed during the rise of pan-Africanism and national communism in academic exchanges involving students who migrated between these geographies.academic exchange, memory, Horn of Africa, Eastern Europe, communismAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Lorena Anton
Institution / affiliation: University of Bucharest
City: Bucharest
Country: Romania
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Laura Bisaillon
Institution / affiliation: University of Toronto
City: Toronto
Country: Canada
After the 1950s, the Horn of Africa developed new, strategic relations with Communist Eastern Europe. The politics of international cooperation in education, uncommonly until then in this area, played out in a double context: the rise of national communism in Eastern Europe, often in opposition to Moscow, on the one hand, and the rise of pan-Africanism in the Horn, starting with the Organization of African Unity in 1963 in Ethiopia. From envisioned common political agendas, further solidarities materialized in the realm of university exchanges and migrations of academics, faculty and students, within and between these geographies. A corpus of future intellectuals from the Horn of Africa was encouraged to pursue advanced study west of the USSR, while remaining within the ‘communist bloc’. When major social and structural changes transformed societies in the Horn of Africa during the 1970s and 1980s, mobile academic subjects migrated to Eastern Europe, and, from there, dispersed worldwide.
What memories do those who left have? And, what about those who remained? How do so-called positive memory-narratives, such as those associated with youth and university exchanges in a far-off lands intersect with traumatic memory of exile, social dislocation, and political uncertainty? We invite contributions from anthropologists exploring academic connections between Horn of African and Eastern European countries during communism.
We are particularly interested in evocative ethnographic analyses that reconfigure connections and disruptions in politics, memory and remembering to produce fresh insights about how these solidarities, circulations and mobilities inform our present.
From Waste to Ressource. Anthropology of Recycling of Urban Scums [Commission on Urban Anthropology]We will focus on the way urban anthropology is addressing the issue of recycling waste into resource in the formal and informal contexts of both production and appropriation of the living space, reevaluating the categories of thought and values of clean and dirty, useful and useless.Waste, recycling, resource, living spaceAcademic Degree: Phd
Name: Corine VEDRINE
Institution / affiliation: Laure-EVS/Ecole Nationale Supérieure d'Architecture de Lyon
City: Vaulx-en-Velin
Country: France
Academic Degree: Phd
Name: Velislava Petrova
Institution / affiliation: Sofia University St Kliment Ohridski
City: Sofia
Country: Bulgaria
As Douglas has showed it, dirt is a matter out of place and beyond classifications, what and whom we consider as unclean challenges the social order and it is classified as a scum by society. Kristeva also argues that our seemingly natural reaction to abject and abjection needs to be (re)considered and interpreted in spatial metaphors. “Spaces of abjection” therefore produce beliefs and practices related to the distanciation and distinction of the unclean while stigmatize and marginalize not only individuals and populations but also the way those are materially and spatially inscribed. Recycling and all the activities related to the process of reclassification of the unnecessary and/or unclean in fact reevaluates the categories of thought, values and social hierarchies of clean and dirty, useful and useless, dignified and undignified, noble and ignoble.
We are particularly interested in the processes through which waste becomes a resource both in formal and informal contexts of habitat. This invites us to study the conception, perception and experience of spaces (Lefevbre) by questioning 1) The use of waste in space conception and production. 2) The ways people inhabit spaces, the uses and appropriations of waste by residents, domestic units and collective spaces. Capitalism's way of recovering from these forms of critiques of industrial production and overconsumption (Boltanski and Chiapello) by transforming it into symbolic and market value (as recycling lobbying), will also attract our attention.
Games, Technology and Concepts: resources we use for teaching and learning anthropology [IUAES Commission on Anthropology and Education].Are you using a game, form of technology or concept which you would like to share with other anthropology educators and learners? We invite you to showcase resources from early years, school, university, continuing education and independent study. Let’s explore creative ways to teach and learn.Resources, Education, Teaching, Learning, TechnologyAcademic Degree: BA, MA
Name: Emma Ford
Institution / affiliation: Royal Anthropological Institute
City: London
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: Doctorado
Name: Mailing Rivera Lam
Institution / affiliation: Coordinadora Subsede Catedra UNESCO Lectura y escritura, Directora Proyecto ACACIA, Universidad de Antofagasta
City: Antofagasta
Country: Chile
We invite participants to showcase resources used to teach and learn anthropology. This panel provides a hands-on complement to the ‘Teaching and Learning’ panel from the IUAES Commission on Anthropology and Education. Rather than traditional paper proposals, our vision is to show, tell and discuss games, technology and concepts which are used around the world to teach anthropology courses and ideas (and to teach anthropologically). In additional to contributing to a visual showcase of resources from around the world, we invite presenters to explore why and how particular teaching and learning resources work (or don’t work) in particular contexts.



What role do physical games, video games, websites, films, role-play activities, podcasts and items of material culture play in anthropology education? What types of resources help build anthropological ways of thinking? What creative ways are there to engage students? How have anthropology teaching and learning resources changed over the last fifty years? How might resources change in the next fifty years? What role can technology play in the teaching and learning of anthropology? What makes learning memorable and how can we take students’ interests and preferences into account?



By bringing resources together from around the world we will consider how to select and adapt resources for particular local contexts. It’s a chance to explore creative possibilities for learners and teachers to engage with anthropology.
Gendered Solidarities, Fragmented Responsibilities: Researchers’ Responses to Challenging TimesThis panel focuses on critical reflections and methodological framings, the ways researchers negotiate their power, agency, and positionality, while transcending the boundaries of social or cultural anthropology, including: intersectional explorations of solidarity, gender and knowledge production.solidarity, fieldwork, feminism, co-creation, methodologyAcademic Degree: Professor
Name: Katarzyna Kosmala
Institution / affiliation: University of the West of Scotland
City: Paisley
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: Dr
Name: Anna Sznajder
Institution / affiliation: Polish Ethological Society
City: Cracow
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: Professor
Name: Fiona Hackney
Institution / affiliation: Wolverhampton University
City: Wolverhampton
Country: United Kingdom
Over the last few decades, we have been facing an increasingly complex, messy and contradictory picture of the research field and what it takes to be a researcher in the contemporary world. On the one hand, there is increasing interest in co-creation and action-based methods with growing evidence that research engagement can produce significant shifts in knowledge, which results in beneficial change for communities. On the other hand, familiar patterns of power and discrimination persist in an increasingly interconnected world. We welcome interdisciplinary enquiries, artistic interventions, theoretical and empirical contributions, examining issues of solidarity, mobilising researchers to act for gender equality. Acknowledging that socially constructed bodies respond differently to dominance and subordination, through ambiguity, transgression, rebellion and protest, we seek contributions that engage feminist-inspired framings as a central axis for analysing the researcher and the researched. Tensions between pressures to conform and the need for resistance in the construction of academic writing, moreover, require further reflection from the perspective of our desire for solidarity and our responsibilities in the field. This panel focuses on critical reflections and methodological framings, the ways researchers negotiate their power, agency, and positionality, while transcending the boundaries of social or cultural anthropology, including, but not limited to, the following themes:
- intersectional explorations of solidarity, gender and knowledge production
- co-creating care
- solidarities at the centre and periphery
- feminist methods vs post-colonialism
- solidarities of feminisms
- ‘appropriate’ feminists: engagement, agency and change
- solidarity, power and transgression
- anthropology of friendship
Global health, onehealth and various solidarities for deadly disease epidemic response in Africa.We invite papers from various scholars which address the following : 1. Interventions guided by global health solidarities during infectious disease epidemics 2. Critical discussions about of the importance of ‘ third world solidarities’, including concealment of disease epidemicsGlobal health, disease epidemic, responseAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Grace Akello
Institution / affiliation: Gulu University, Faculty of Medicine
City: Gulu
Country: Uganda
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Benson Mulemi
Institution / affiliation: Catholic University of East Africa
City: Nairobi
Country: Kenya
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Ulrike Beisel
Institution / affiliation: Bayreuth University
City: Bayreuth
Country: Germany
Declaring any country a disaster setting due to a deadly disease epidemic offers global health researchers and humanitarian workers unlimited access to the diseased setting. Whereas global health researchers’ interests are in diagnostics, clinical and vaccine trials- rarely treatment of the vulnerable people; humanitarian interventions are hindered considerably by preset humanitarian organizations’ mandates which guide how they will intervene. The presence of global health research and humanitarian organisations deadly disease settings has increasingly been criticized and blamed for the escalation of epidemics in the global south, particularly Africa. Some critics consider the presence of the two organisations part of the problem, disruptive and deflecting African Ministries of Health’s efforts to deal with priority health issues. Many countries at risk of infectious epidemics in Africa and elsewhere in the global south have experienced the politics of global health and onehealth approaches in epidemic control and have devised a type of ‘world solidarity’ we will call third world solidarity. This solidarity enables them prioritise treatment and saving vulnerable people’s lives. The third world solidarity during epidemics manifests itself in denial, refusal to declare an experience with an infectious disease epidemic. Tensions reflected in the two world health solidarities described above call for a critical anthropological engagement concerning how the different types of solidarities simultaneously lead to the escalation of the infectious diseases and affect epidemics control. We invite paper proposals by medical anthropologists and other researchers to share their experiences with these two global solidarities.
Growing old in times of divisions: Explorations of solidarity in late lifeThis panel intends to challenge, through ethnographic encounters, interdisciplinary creative work and methodological innovation, the narrow portrayal of late life in terms of either dependency or excessive self-reliance, by looking at policies and everyday practices of solidarity.old age; ageism; solidarity; life course; successful ageingAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Cristina Douglas
Institution / affiliation: University of Aberdeen, Department of Social Anthropology
City: Aberdeen
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Adriana Teodorescu
Institution / affiliation: Babeș-Bolyai University, Department of Sociology
City: Cluj-Napoca
Country: Romania
With a growing population worldwide, old age is depicted nowadays as a global and national socio-economic burden. Neoliberal paradigms of growing old such as successful, healthy or active ageing are bolstering the view of old age as something that can be controlled, with the task of achieving it becoming a moral individual responsibility rather than a collective enterprise. Concurrently, frailty, both mental and physical, becomes stigmatised as failure in not being able to contribute any further to the social and economic resources of the community. This not only reinforces structural inequalities that are independent of the choices of individuals, irrespective of their life stage, but also supports ageism by portraying old age as having no meaningful worth as a life stage.
We invite papers that, through ethnographic encounters, interdisciplinary creative work and methodological innovation, challenge the narrow portrayal of late life in terms of either dependency or excessive self-reliance, by looking at policies and everyday practices of solidarity within small and large communities. Potential topics are to address solidarities in late life in relation to: - Compassion and altruism
- Cross-generational perspectives
- Socio-economic classes across life course and in late life
- Growing old in conflict zones
- Networks of solidarity (care settings, digital forms of care etc.)
- Volunteering practices
- Transnational practices
- Inter-species forms of solidarity across life course and in late life
- Socio-political divisions and the potentiality of solidarity in old age
- Lack of solidarity and its effects.
Her-story in visual anthropology of the Middle East: Women's narratives of historical events [Commission on Anthropology of Middle East]The session/s will present women's narratives of historical events in the Middle East, based on visual materials. The presentations will elaborate on life stories, which highlight some insights regarding social and political changes through time. Screening of visual materials is welcome.Key words: women's narratives; visual anthropology; social/political changesAcademic Degree: Prof.
Name: Esther Hertzog
Institution / affiliation: Zefat Academic College
City: Zefat
Country: Israel
Academic Degree: Dr.
Name: Eirini Chrysocheri
Institution / affiliation: Goldsmiths, University of London
City: London
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: Dr.
Name: Carolina Bracco
Institution / affiliation: University of Buenos Aires
City: Buenos Aires
Country: Argentina

The session/s will elaborate on women's narratives, which relate to historical events/processes in the Middle East and are based on visual materials.

Following Carol Hanisch's feminist claim that "the personal is political" (published first in February 1969) we perceive women's personal narratives (her/story) of their life experiences as reflecting broader social phenomena. Thus, we welcome presentations which elaborate on women's life stories that offer some insights regarding social and political changes through time in various societies in the Middle East.

The study of social life in the Middle East by visual means can enrich anthropological knowledge in general and of this region in particular. Employing visual materials enables us to deepen our understanding of processes that have occurred in the near and distant past. It is expected that the presentations will examine women's narratives, presented by visual means, as providing unfamiliar, innovative understanding of gender issues, such as the role of women in historical events, their unrecognized contribution to their societies, etc.

Hence, the use of documentary films, photographs, posters, albums, advertisements and other means of data collecting that are connected to women's narratives are welcome as a basis for discussing gender issues in a way that portrays present and past events and combines the artistic and sociological. The presentations can reveal, demonstrate and unveil the role of cultural codes and symbols in constructing the cultural and political reproduction of patriarchal social order. They can discuss historical events and processes in which women played a major role and more.
Hitchhiking: affect, spaces and storiesFor generations, despite being a global form of transport solidarity, hitchhiking has not been directly explored in anthropology. Even more broadly within the social sciences and humanities, there is a dearth in understanding this form of mobility. This panel provides a response to such an oversighthitchhiking/autostop, transport solidarity, alternative mobilities, shared economyAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Patrick LAVIOLETTE
Institution / affiliation: UCL / Tallinn Univ.
City: Tallinn
Country: Estonia
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Jacqueline HOLLER
Institution / affiliation: UNBC
City: Prince George
Country: Canada
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Michael O'REGAN
Institution / affiliation: Bournemouth Univ.
City: Bournemouth
Country: United Kingdom
A billion operating cars worldwide, with people on the road around 1.1 hours a day, have spawned an emergent, complex system of roads and motorways no longer designed for people. The private, self-driving, autonomous – or driverless car – promises to create a system of freedom and liberation. Instead, for many commentators, it is creating car-dependent cultures with banal infrastructural spaces of car parks, filling stations and repair garages to service motorways that structure and produce unsustainable automobilities, reflecting a deeper social malaise of loneliness, melancholy and even anger. In this context, hitchhikers are an increasingly rare species. The geographical range of hitchhiking is extending east as its western frontier dwindles, its vaunted imminent extinction driven by discourses of danger, individualism and marginality.

Paradoxically, however, such an era is witnessing an autostop/hitchhiking revival through race competitions, art events, hitch gatherings and even pop-culture publications. Producing its own geographies, practices and emotions, hitchhiking contests and possibly subverts the apparent consensus of neoliberalised transportation. This panel, based on our respective varied interests in certain facets of hitchhiking (such as gender, tourism mobility, counter-culture and thrill seeking) will explore some of the spaces, narratives, eccentricities and affective responses of this practice to challenge current thinking about the organisation of movement, friction and (auto)mobile materialities. We seek papers that address such hitchhiking related themes in order to put together the first comprehensive scholarly overview on this practice to occur within the social sciences.

Hopes: Emotional Solidarities and Affective Futures in “Dark” TimesThe future has become bleak, but still not without hope. The panel focuses on the role of emotions and affects in ethnographic encounters with futures in making and aims to explore and problematise the notions of hope and solidarity in “dark” times.Hope, Future, Solidarities, Affects, EmotionsAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Marek Pawlak
Institution / affiliation: Jagiellonian University in Cracow
City: Cracow
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Stefan Wellgraf
Institution / affiliation: European University Viadrina
City: Frankfurt (Oder)
Country: Germany
Anthropology has not only documented, but also experienced itself a shift from hopeful futures to a rather bleak outlook on societies marked by neoliberalism and neonationalism. While the orientation to the future looms large in the present, it has lost its progressive promise. It is a time of multiple crises and uncertainties as well as of emerging possibilities and (more modest) hopes, which jointly impact the future gaze. We witness various new forms of imagining, sensing and acting upon what lies ahead, which go along with different, often unexpected hopes and solidarities, but also with new obstacles and “cruel optimism”, with the destruction of solidary ties and new forms of exclusion.

The panel looks at contemporary notions of hope and solidarity, especially those currently emerging or in the process of making, which have not yet been fully registered or conceived. It focuses on the role of affects and emotions in ethnographic encounters with futures in making. Solidarities are thus approached as temporary assemblages that can be created along the lines of dark or bright futures. They involve complex ways of dealing with the present, while anticipating the future. In a similar way, hope is affectively charged and future-oriented. While “the principle of hope” (Bloch) was for long clearly marked by a neo-Marxist version of the society to come, new forms of hope mark the current conjuncture.

We invite papers, which by drawing on ethnography explore futures in the making in relation with emerging solidarities and hopes, emotions and affects.
Imagining and Practising Solidarities in Urban Contexts [Sponsored by the Commission on Urban Anthropology]This panel focuses on cities as spaces of emergent and inspiring practices of human solidarities that challenge the effects of the late industrialist global condition characterized by growing social inequalities and indifference to human suffering and environmental destruction.formal and informal solidarity, activism, heritageAcademic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Hana Cervinkova
Institution / affiliation: University of Lower Silesia
City: Wrocław
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Giuliana Prato
Institution / affiliation: University of Kent
City: Kent
Country: United Kingdom
From sanctuary cities to urban social movements and community activism, cities across the world generate inspirational ideas and practices that challenge the effects of global social inequalities and environmental destruction. Many societies have a tradition of informal dynamics of solidarity. One thinks, on the one hand, of various kinds of charities but also of individual actions that are aimed to help poor urban dwellers. On the other hand, cities are also seedbeds of organized urban movements, which can be transnational in scope. We are looking for contributions which build on concrete projects and programmes, as well as on everyday practices of collaboration and solidarity in urban contexts, including case material and ethnographically-based analysis of: - Actions in support of the socially and economically disadvantaged, and politically marginalised;
- Practices aimed at building cooperative relations in neighbourhoods among native and non-native residents;
- Social activism and its potential political impact;
- The construction of solidarity through heritage practices, including the social role of memory and of historical forms of cooperation;
- The drive to creating more sustainable environmental futures. We are interested in forms of co-operation among different urban dwellers, which might extend to formal and informal forms of support and solidarity.
Immigrants and IDPs in Europe – what kind of Europe do they reveal?Immigrants and IDPs presence in Europe today has caused various scenarios of behaviours uncovering dominant axiologies, normative systems and politics – from openness to ostracism aimed at the incomers. We welcome you to discussion on “what kind of Europe do immigrations reveal”?Europe, immigration, IDPs, systems, institutionsAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Agnieszka Chwieduk
Institution / affiliation: Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology
City: Poznan
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: Associate Professor
Name: Viktoriya Sereda
Institution / affiliation: Department of Sociology, Ukrainian Catholic University
City: Lviv
Country: Ukraine
Academic Degree: Phd
Name: Svitlana Odynets
Institution / affiliation: Junior Research Fellow at the Department of Social Anthropology in Ethnology Institute of National Academy of Science in Ukraine
City: Lviv
Country: Ukraine
Immigrants and IDPs presence in Europe since 20th century has caused various reactions in countries which take them in. The Old Continent has become a dynamic laboratory for various scenarios of collective behaviours uncovering dominant axiologies, normative systems and politics – from openness to ostracism aimed at the incomers, from the fiasco of “integration programmes” to extreme racist attitudes. In this context, we welcome you to participate in a discussion on “what kind of Europe do immigrations reveal”?
Important themes:
- who are immigrants and IDPs in Europe today?
- how we should explore immigration (micro, makro, institutional level) in Europe ?
- how immigration (and IDPs) is defined by family-decisions, market and welfare state regimes, especially as for mobility from former communist states in Central and Eastern Europe to global North?
- how gender order is negotiated through lenses of neoliberal economies and new national movements?
- what axiological and normative ( also law and order) systems make up Europe and what do they depend on in the context of immigration and IDPs ?
- what divisions in Europe have been made visible by the immigration / immigration crisis and what do they result from?
- what will come after the immigration crisis?
(Im)Mobilising Longing: subversive potentials and seductive snares between distance and desirePractices, trajectories, and places of longing are keys to the imaginative horizons (Crapazano, 2003) and the alternative utopias (Kiossev, 2013) of societies. This panel explores the subversive potential of longing, the seductive snares that longing can create, and its mobilizing capacity.Affect, Imagination, Utopia, Nostalgia, ResistanceAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Hannah Wadle
Institution / affiliation: FairerTales
City: Speyer
Country: Germany
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Łukasz Kaczmarek
Institution / affiliation: Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza
City: Poznań
Country: Poland
Practices, trajectories, and places of longing are keys to the imaginative horizons (Crapanzano, 2003) and the alternative utopias (Kiossev, 2013) of individuals and societies. Yet, if “belonging” holds a prominent place in contemporary Anthropology, the notion of “longing” has tended to appear in a more marginal position. This panel furthers a recent shift of perspective from belonging to longing that research on nostalgia, on hope and yearning, or on tourism and migrant imaginaries has initiated in the past years.

We invite presenters to address longing as a human strategy, cultural technique, affective and possibly spiritual engagement with the world – one that operates across time and space and is able to transcend them through a negotiation between distance and desire. This panel suggests a reflection on global practices of longing and their moral, political, economic, and spiritual trajectories in the light of desired change, necessary resistance, experienced loss, and regimes of consumption (of mobility, imaginaries, romance).

In the light of the overall conference theme of “world solidarity”, longing has particular relevance – acts of solidarity often occur hand in hand with shared senses or traditions of longing. Deepening the link with the congress theme, we call contributors to consider the subversive potential of longing, the seductive traps that longing can create, and the mobilizing capacity of longing for individuals and societies.

We particularly welcome papers that explore longing as intersection of personal experiences, cultural environments of longing (eg. Sehnsucht, saudade, dor, akogare), and global narratives (incl. tourism, consumption, neoliberalism).
In the Vastness of Loss: Toward a Multiscalar Theory of LossThis panel engages concepts of loss from everyday experiences to questions of a planetary scale. Bringing together potentially incommensurate manifestations, imaginations and articulations enables a creative multiscalar theorization of loss that helps us better understand the world we live in.Loss, ethnography, creativity, representationAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Fiona Murphy
Institution / affiliation: Queens University Belfast
City: Dublin
Country: Ireland
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Stavroula Pipyrou
Institution / affiliation: St Andrews
City: St Andrews
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Evi Chatzipanagiotidou
Institution / affiliation: Queens University Belfast
City: Belfast
Country: United Kingdom
Humans experience, fear, and imagine loss across vast scales. For a child, lost toys or sleeping in a different bed might be as frightening and daunting as a large-scale wartime evacuation or apocalyptic scenarios of Earth’s annihilation. With the potential to be both harmful and generative, loss can be manifested as mourning, melancholia, nostalgia, sadness, trauma and depression or as ethical responsibility and a cunning affirmation of life. Our intention here is to engage with concepts of loss from grassroots everyday experiences to questions of a planetary scale. Bringing together potentially incommensurate manifestations, imaginations and articulations enables a creative multiscalar theorization of loss that will help us better understand the world in which we live.

We invite papers that engage with scales of loss through diverse techniques and methods. Contributions may include works in progress – podcasts, short documentary clips, photos/art, music, dance, theatre, ethnofiction, reenactments of stories of loss and other imaginative formats. We welcome thoughtful, provocative contributions that push the limits of multiscalar anthropological explorations of loss.
Indigenous Museum, Objects, Cultural Heritage and Reconnaissance Policies [Commission on Museums and Cultural Heritage-COMACH]This panel will discuss the relationship between property rights of artifacts, but also territory and resources and stories about mediators of knowledge, including ethics, politics and stories of recognition, as well as their potential of the transformation of museum practices of indigenous peoplesMuseums, Cultural Heritage, Indigenous Museum, Ethnographic objects,Academic Degree: Ph.D
Name: Renato Athias
Institution / affiliation: UFPE
City: Recife
Country: Brazil
Academic Degree: Ph.D
Name: Alexandre Gomes
Institution / affiliation: NEPE/UFPE
City: Recife
Country: Brazil
Academic Degree: Ph.D
Name: Pascale De Robert
Institution / affiliation: IRD/France
City: Paris
Country: France
Cultural heritage is the main theme of this panel which intends to discuss the relationship between property rights of artifacts, but also territory and resources and stories about the mediators of knowledge, including ethics, politics and stories of recognition, as well as their potential of the transformation of museum practices of indigenous peoples, based on recent experiences in traditional museum institutions. The presentations will address issues related to Amerindian collections, analyzing cultural heritage strategies linked to these objects and issues related to broader claims of indigenous peoples' rights. It also aims to discuss recent experiences with conservation practices and exhibitions, promoting debate in venues where current museum discussions are blurring the traditional perception between ethnographic and art museums. The purpose of this panel is also to create a dialogue between museum professionals and Amerindians peoples by examining the dimensions of intrinsic ethics and politics, and stories of recognition often overlooked in current museum practices.
Infrastructure Building, Mobility, and SolidaritySince the new form of mobility and complexity of cities around the world, our panel welcomes papers addressing emerging aspects of urban and rural lives across different sites, and aims to develop understanding of the relations among infrastructure building, mobility, and solidarity.infrastructure, migration, mobility, solidarityAcademic Degree: professor
Name: Zhou Daming
Institution / affiliation: Center for Migration and Ethnicity
City: Guangzhou
Country: China
Academic Degree: professor
Name: Tan Chee-Beng
Institution / affiliation: Anthropology Department of Sun Yat-sen University
City: Guangzhou
Country: Malaysia
In the past two decades, both cities and rural areas around the world gained new forms of mobility and complexity in shaping human encounters. One perspective in anthropology is to see cities and developing rural areas as sites for the confluence of infrastructures and cultures. Infrastructures here include not only roads, railways, water pipes, or electric grids, but also media, Internet, and languages that allow for the trafficking of people, goods, ideas, beliefs, and lifestyles. To think of infrastructures relationally requires us to look at the ways in which old and new infrastructures are woven into the everyday workings of a locale, and how they inform the distribution of resources, generate political contestation, and articulate the City with globalizing forces. Then, what kinds of forces are behind the establishment of these old and new infrastructures? How do infrastructures become landscapes, and how do certain aesthetics mediate this process? How do local, translocal and transnational people perceive, use, react or navigate such revamped ways of connectivity? What kinds of politics, imaginaries, memories and belongings are emerging? How will connections among people generate new forms of solidarities, albeit truncated ones? This panel welcomes papers addressing emerging aspects of urban and rural lives across different sites in the global south, and aims to develop understanding of the relations between infrastructure building, mobility, and solidarities.
Is there any place for solidarity in post-socialist healthcare systems?We propose discussion on post-socialist healthcare from the perspective of expectations and experiences of patients and professionals. We will ask how they perceive reforms, what strategies they use to cope with their adverse effects and whether any forms of solidarity are possible in these systems.post-socialism, healthcare, reforms, strategies, solidarityAcademic Degree: PhD, Post-doctoral degree
Name: Danuta Penkala-Gawęcka
Institution / affiliation: Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań
City: Poznań
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Anna Klepikova
Institution / affiliation: European University at Saint Petersburg
City: Saint Petersburg
Country: Russia
This panel proposes discussion on healthcare systems in the vast post-socialist and post-Soviet region, considering both patients’ and medical professionals’ perspectives. We would call attention to their expectations about the fundamental transformation of healthcare and their experiences of ongoing and/or implemented reforms.

In post-socialists countries the previous, strongly centralised healthcare based on the Semashko model was replaced with various systems, with different part of state financing and health insurance contributions, as well as different share of the private healthcare sector. As some anthropological research in post-socialist contexts revealed, despite the experts’ positive evaluations of the reforms, both users and providers of healthcare may be dissatisfied with their outcomes. We are interested in identifying people’s opinions, attitudes and feelings about healthcare services in different settings, and the reasons for their assessments. Do they feel like victims of predatory capitalism or recognise benefits of the new system? Is there any nostalgia for the socialist healthcare among those who remember the previous system? What are the most serious challenges faced by the people? What strategies do they develop to cope with what they perceive as adverse effects of the reforms? Is there any place for social justice, solidarity and support for the vulnerable in those systems? These questions may be tackled in the context of particular domains of biomedicine, such as psychiatry, oncology or obstetrics, and/or in relation to reproductive health, access to biomedical technologies, etc.

We especially welcome contributions by medical anthropologists or other social scientists, based on ethnographic research.
Islands Ethnography: Reflecting “islandness” in the anthropoceneThis panel seeks to link research interests about islands and to exchange experiences and reflections, especially related to the real geography of islands, as well as to develop conceptual frameworks that can be used to build common approaches for research on and about islands.Islands, Ethnography, Methodology, Islandness, AnthropoceneAcademic Degree: Ph.D
Name: Francesco Bachis
Institution / affiliation: University of Cagliari
City: Cagliari
Country: Italy
Academic Degree: BA, MA
Name: Greca N. Meloni
Institution / affiliation: University of Vienna
City: Vienna
Country: Austria
Academic Degree: Dipl.-Päd., MA
Name: Sarah Nimführ
Institution / affiliation: University of Vienna
City: Vienna
Country: Austria
In recent years, islands have experienced a hype in various research areas: flight and migration (Bachis 2016; Nimführ 2016; Mountz 2011), tourism (Wang 2017), ecology – with special reference to climate change, interspecies, and «friction» in the Anthropocene (Tsing 2005) – heritage making (Bujis 2016, Welz 2017), island cities and urban archipelagos (Grydehøj 2015) etc. Furthermore, there is an increased scientific interest on various forms of solidarities within islands and beyond them (e.g. Guribye & Stalsberg Mydland 2018; Reckinger 2013).

The objectives of the proposed panel are three-fold: 1) to link research interests that address the historical and/or current discourses on “islandness” and geographical location, (political) dependence, resource management, energy transition and ecology, as well as sociocultural forms of island life; 2) to develop theoretical and conceptual frameworks that can be used to build common approaches for research on and about islands, and 3) to promote and facilitate discussion, information exchange and cooperation between ‘island researchers’ at European and international level.

This panel, therefore, invites scientists, who work on islands or are doing research about islands, to give insights on their island research. These can deal with the special features, challenges and opportunities of the island both content analytical and method-theoretical. Likewise, questions of comparison, in which differences, similarities and intertwines of island research are worked out, can be analysed.

The session is open to contributions that focus more specifically on issues impacting on islands and island life as well as on methodological issues in research on and about islands.
Issues of Kinship Theory: Solidarity or Logic? [Commission on Theoretical Anthropology]This session builds on early concepts and emergent issues about kinship, beginning with the solidarity theory of society developed by Ibn Khaldun in the 1300s. What does procreation involve, is there an atom of kinship, how does kinship relate to the incest taboo, what about kinship terminologies?kinship, procreation, incest taboo, solidarityAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Dwight Read
Institution / affiliation: University of California, Los Angeles
City: Los Angeles
Country: USA
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Vladimir Popov
Institution / affiliation: University of St. Petersburg
City: St. Petersburg
Country: Russia
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Fadwa El Guindi
Institution / affiliation: American University in Cairo
City: Cairo
Country: Egypt
The 14thcentury scholar, Abdul Rahman Ibn Khaldun, was the first to develop a theory of society and societal change based on the notion of ‘asabiyya, translated from the Arabic as ‘solidarity’. Ibn Khaldun’s theory is embedded in kinship – ‘asabiyya being the genealogical bond among relatives-- four centuries before Emile Durkheim bifurcated solidarity into mechanical and organic.

As a construct, kinship has been a defining foundation in the development of anthropological theory. Ethnography continues to show the centrality of the kinship domain in people’s lives. The past decade has seen visceral debates across the four fields of anthropology regarding the position of kinship study in anthropology. Attempts have been made at synthesizing ethnographic, linguistic and population-genetic approaches to human kinship into a single theoretical paradigm.

This session proposes to build on early conceptualizations and emergent issues, presenting a new theory or new cross-cultural data, or both. Analyses of data on kinship formed by non-procreative means raises the issue of what procreation really means. A new look at old debates leads to questions such as: Must there be an atom of kinship and what would be its content? To what extent, and how, does, the incest taboo become a fundamental and shared feature of the domain called kinship.? Kinship terminologies have a long and rich history of analysis. How can a focus on the study of kinship terminology today advance our understanding of kinship as a universal category of analysis and a pervasive human activity around the world?
Land rights movements by the indigenous people of the worldThe panel aims to articulate the nature of resistance movements by the indigenous people, the roles of INGOs/ alliances in fomenting these movements and a global perspective on this in the light of debates on Ecosystem vrs Development and rights of the Developed vrs rights of the under-developed.Resistance Movements, Indigenous people, Global perspective, Sacred landscapes.Academic Degree: PH.D
Name: BINAY KUMAR PATTNAIK
Institution / affiliation: INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY KANPUR
City: KANPUR
Country: India
Academic Degree: PH.D
Name: ZULFIQUAR ALI ISLAM
Institution / affiliation: DEPT. OF SOCIOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF RAJSHAHI
City: RAJSHAHI
Country: Bangladesh
The indigenous communities world over have staged resistance movements against the encroachment of their territories be it for industrialization/ mining or spread of Agro-business/ aqua-firming. By now the struggle of the indigenous people against state and the agents of capital for defending their sacred landscapes, livelihood and culture) is a global phenomenon. The entire Latin America has witnessed resistance movements by the indigenous people; worth mentioning are those in states like, Brazil, Ecuador, Colombia and Mexico. No exception is North America. Note worthy are the protests by the indigenous people, e,g, in Quebec, Canada 1970s onward against Hydro-project and globalization, in Brazil the Pataxo tribe in Roraima state, Guarani Kaiowa people in the state of Mato grasso do sul, and the Munduruku tribe in the Amazon belt, in Mexico the Totonacs tribe of Veracruz province against the an Oil MNC, during 1980-90s in Taiwan’s Li-Shan area of Taichung county in alliance with ATA, during the 1990s with alliances like AMAN.1 and AMA Kalbar in Indonesia, during 1990s in the Sarwak province of Malaysia against the Borneo hydro projects, and 1990s onward at Lanjigarh and Kashipur in Indian state Odisha against Aluminium MNCs. Thus the panel aims to articulate; (1) the diverse/ unique nature of these movements, (2) the roles of international/ national organizations/ associations/ alliances/ federations in fostering these movements and (3) a global perspective of these movements in the light of debates on Ecosystem vrs Development and rights of the Developed vrs rights of the under-developed over natural resources.
Lands of the Extracto-cene: The Extractive Industries, Climate Change and Mobile Pastoralists [Commission for Nomadic Peoples]We invite papers to take a holistic approach to studying how pastoralist societies act upon the accumulation of environmental change and extractive industries in their lands.mining, mobile pastoralism, climate changeAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Ariell Ahearn-Ligham
Institution / affiliation: Oxford University
City: Oxford
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Bruce Forbes
Institution / affiliation: University of Lapland
City: Rovaniemi
Country: Finland
In the traditional territories of mobile pastoralists around the world, there is a form of land use that is expanding its reach with the help of new technologies and innovations in engineering, alongside a global hyper-consumerism that makes natural resources like copper, gold, natural gas and rare earths essential for the production of ‘modern’ livelihoods and technologies. The UNEP showns that global mineral extraction increased threefold in the last forty years; this trend is projected to continue in decades to come (UNEP 2016). Amongst scholars, there have been a number of studies focused on mining and mobile pastoralists, namely in Mongolia, Oman, the Arctic and Africa, but dialogue on the issues as it relates to the broader challenges faced by pastoralists remains few and far between.

We aim to bring together experts working on extractive industries and mobile pastoralism globally in order to advance the scholarship in this emerging field. We examine forms of co-existence between mobile pastoralists and the extractive industries in regions where mobile animal husbandy was historically the dominate form of land use. In what ways do pastoralists adapt, resist, ignore or work with the new land users in these territories? How does the cumulative impacts of climate change and extraction impact pastoralists? How does the expansion and intensification of extraction relate with ongoing social and environmental change amongst mobile peoples? We invite papers to take a holistic approach to studying how pastoralist societies act upon the accumulation of environmental change and extractive industries in their lands.
Life-World and Visual Anthropology [Commission on Visual Anthropology]Anthropologists have contributed concepts such as Language Families, Kinship, Anthropology of Structure, etc. to constructing the unity of human diversity. This panel explores the possibility of the concept of Life-World as object of anthropology, especially as object of visual anthropology.Life-World, human, unity, diversity, visual anthropologyAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Bao Jiang
Institution / affiliation: institute of sociology, chinese academy of social sciences
City: Beijing
Country: China
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Itsushi Kawase
Institution / affiliation: National Museum of Ethnology
City: Osaka
Country: Japan
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Metje Postma
Institution / affiliation: Leiden University
City: Leiden
Country: The Netherlands
Finding and inventing the unity of human diversity has been one of main missions of anthropology since the 19th century. And anthropologists have contributed concepts such as Language Families, Kinship, Anthropology of Structure, etc. to fulfilling the mission. Since the publication of Writing Culture in the 1980s, the concept of Culture as object of anthropology has been challenged. This panel focuses on exploring the possibility of the concept of Life-World as object of anthropology, especially as object of visual anthropology.


'Living on the Edge': Challenges of Human Security and Survival(Commission on Human Rights)Due to socio-political reasons and economic want and for environmental changes survival of human being has become very challenging. Anthropology with its holistic approach and micro study may provide the proper perspective to address these challenges for a better world.environment ; development ; deforestation ; degradation; human securityAcademic Degree: Ph.D in Anthropology
Name: Prof. Buddhadeb Chaudhuri
Institution / affiliation: Retired
City: Kolkata
Country: India
After the colonial rule, with the formation of different nation-states, there is large scale migration in different parts of the globe and more intense struggle or fight for access and command over various natural resources, be it oil, forest or mineral resources. Because of this more intense exploitation of natural resources, the environment is also adversely affected resulting various types of environmental degradations and survival of certain sections of population more difficult. The more powerful or influential and affluent sections could migrate to better places for survival which is not possible for the disadvantaged people because of various reasons.
Indigenous people, all over the world, appreciably depend on forest for their survival. They get food, fuel, fodder and even medicine from the forest. Any change in the forest situation or forest type may affect their survival. Thus even the commercial a forestation may create problem. This may, on one hand, affect their subsistence pattern and also their health as medicinal plants and proper nutrition may not be available. Again, deforestation may lead to soil erosion and flood in different areas. The indigenous people have evolved their practices which are suitable in a given eco-system. Documentation of such traditional practices may help to develop sustainable development strategy.
Again, in many flood prone areas or coastal areas, a land-owner may become landless due to erosion. Unable to face the stress, people commit suicide. This happens more when people take loan for development. All these issues may be examined in this panel.
Local medicines experiences in global context.This panel aims at making an approach on conceptions and practices of local medicines. The issue taking the main position is the local and medical experiences about this phenomenon worldwide.Local medicine; health; disease; remedy; global context.Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Jean Paulin Mengue Me Ndongo
Institution / affiliation: The University of Yaounde 1
City: Yaounde
Country: Cameroon
The phenomenon of local medicines has attracted great attention at international and national levels. Large numbers of people and communities are still using their own edicines to cure diseases since the prehistoric period; tradition plays a major role in this. Local medicines are not condemned in innumerable international conventions and declarations. This panel contraints research on local medicines: the various forms, the communities and cultures in which they are prevalent, the cultural and religious backgrounds, the socio economic dimensions, their medical, social implications and legal aspects, regarding efficacy, diagnostic, illness experiences, promotion of health strategies and power relations. The analysis resulting from these approaches can be meaningful in many ways and open new avenues to explore local medicines worldwide.
Local Nature Using in the 21st ctntury: Global Responsibility and Solidarity [Commission on the Indigenous Knowledge and Sustainable Development]Local activity on changing environment often has a great influence on a global level. Special attention to education on sustainability, based on folk empirical knowledge in nature using and responsibility can assist in reducing risks.Environment, Education on Sustainability, SolidarityAcademic Degree: Ph.D
Name: Viacheslav Rudnev
Institution / affiliation: Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology
City: Moscow
Country: Russia
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Dorothy Billings
Institution / affiliation: Wichita State University
City: Wichita
Country: USA
Anthropologists and other scholars have documented very different views of human relationships with nature in different societies with diverse cultures. Indigenous people have been displaced by immigrants with a different survival strategy who have destroyed the nature on which the local people survived. They had used their environment carefully and preserved it for generations. International law supports the claims of indigenous people to their territories and resources, which are sought after by powerful corporations and their governmental supporters. Quite often new technologies assist actively in producing great changes in local landscape and biodiversity, in the areas involved into process of industrial reconstruction. The cultures of local indigenous people support not just their own lives but also all the rest of peoples by taking care of the survival of the environments that they protect.
Anthropologists can help to sustain the environment by solidarity with indigenous people and their environments with education but also with international law. In this panel, both theoretical and empirical papers will discuss perspectives on the realization of a process of education on Sustainability for reducing risks in strategies of Nature-Society relationships.
Lost in translation? Multifaceted solidarities in activist, research and humanitarian contextThe aim of the panel is to shed light on cases and practices from various research, activists and humanitarian contexts, within which it is possible to observe the creation or lack of solidarities between the social actors taking part in those particular encounters.solidarities, encounters, cooperation, communicationAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Miroslava Lukic Krstanovic
Institution / affiliation: Institute of Ethnography SASA / Senior Research Associate
City: Belgrade
Country: Serbia
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Magdalena Sztandara
Institution / affiliation: Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology Jagiellonian University in Cracow / assistant professor
City: Cracow
Country: Poland
In the modern world, there are still places and topics `attractive` as research sites and humanitarian `training ground` for specific social actors with their projects and interests:researchers, activists, representatives of the third sector (NGOs) or journalists. All these interests and projects are often perceived as a one-way relationship, in which specific `voiceless they` from the periphery and `fragile` societies, need to be helped.
The panel aim is to shed light on practices that create possible solidarities through those encounters, which engage reciprocal communication and cooperation. Is the outcome of these practices solidarities as ephemeral acts or long-term utilitarian processes? Solidarities seem to be based on universal and objective principles, but often their understandings depend on a constellation of relationships between particular interests, subjective perceptions or implementations someone`s goals. We want to examine what meanings solidarities have and how they work in various fields and contexts (media, science, the civil sector, the state, everyday life). The confrontation of all faces of solidarity through different actions/cases can bring answers to how solidarities become viable and effective, not just empty terms. The various social actors imagine some form of solidarities, but are not these ideas often `lost in translation`?
We invite all papers drawing on ethnographic research that will adress the topics as follows: meanings of solidarities in the context of academics` careers, activism, and humanitarianism; reciprocity of giving and assistance (subject/object); tactics applying solidarities (media, researchers, activists, volunteers) / solidarity insiders; centres of power, responsibility, and interest.
Mediating Travel: Digital Media, Tourism, and the Cosmopolitan Self in a Hyperconnected World [Commission on the Anthropology of Tourism]Digital media technologies have transformed the relationships between hosts and guests in tourist places. Inviting theoretical and empirical contributions from the global south and north, this panel seeks to gain new understandings of the mutual shaping of cosmopolitan selves and digital media.cosmopolitan self, digital media, solidarity, tourismAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Christian Ritter
Institution / affiliation: Norwayn University of Science and Technology (Department of Social Anthropology)
City: TRONDHEIM
Country: Norway
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Regev Nathansohn
Institution / affiliation: Sapir Academic College (Department of Communication )
City: Sderot
Country: Israel
Digital media technologies have profoundly reshaped travel practices and tourist places. The Internet and digital platforms created a new realm of experience within the global tourism industry, transforming the complex relationships between hosts and guests. On the one hand, tourist blogs disseminate travel narratives and visual representations of tourism sites while reconfiguring the manifold tourism imaginaries. On the other hand, tourism organizations adapt to the ubiquitous use of mobile devices in everyday life by circulating more audio-visual content about tourist destinations. In addition to tourism agencies, mobile applications mediate among tourism actors at the global-local nexus. The authenticity of tourism actors, services and objects is increasingly staged on the screens of mobile devices, changing tourism culture in unprecedented ways. From Airbnb to augmented reality apps new possibilities for solidarity between hosts and guests and for the discovery of tourism sites are enabled, and sometimes prevented. Bringing together tourism scholars who ethnographically explore the digitalization of tourism, and digital ethnographers who study the field of tourism, this panel seeks to gain new understandings of the mutual shaping of cosmopolitan selves and digital media.
We invite theoretical contributions and empirical case studies on the different roles of digital media in contemporary tourism in the global south and north. In what ways does digitalization reshape cosmopolitan selves and solidarities between locals and tourists? How is the authenticity of subjectivities digitally mediated and interpreted in a context of widening dissemination of fake information? What are the epistemological consequences of studying digitized tourist places?
Métissage: Canada and Russia ComparedMétissage often results in new identities, while ethnogenesis, by definition, gives rise to a new ethnos. We are interested in how the two may be intertwined in the emergence of new ethnies or nations in Canada and Russia while in other cases métissage has become at most a historical memory.Métis, métissage, ethnogenesis, identity, IndigenousAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Michel Bouchard
Institution / affiliation: UNBC
City: Prince George
Country: Canada
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Mikhail Bashkirov
Institution / affiliation: North-Eastern Federal University
City: Yakutsk
Country: Russia
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Alex Oehler
Institution / affiliation: UNBC
City: Prince George
Country: Canada
The history of both Canada and Russia was founded upon the colonial expansion of European settler communities into Indigenous lands. In the case of Canada, first French then British colonial governments oversaw expanding trade endeavors deep into the North American continent, sometimes under the banner of state-sanctioned companies, sometimes by free traders, seeking fortune independently. Likewise, the Russian Empire emerged as Cossacks, state traders, and peasants were moving over the Urals pushing in turn to the Pacific in search of furs. The goal of this panel is to examine the history of métissage in the colonial contexts of both states, and to better understand the anthropological implications of such mixing at settler frontiers. In Canada, Métis is the community, while métissage is the mixing. In Russia, too, there are those who would be Métis, while other would be “métissés” or mixed but not Métis. In some cases, ethnogenesis resulted in new identities, highlighting distinctive cultures. In other cases métissage and cultural hybridity occurred while identity remained fixed and tied to the expanding ethnie as opposed to that of the indigenous peoples with whom they intermingled. Cases which may be examined, among others, include those of Amga-Sloboda, Russkoe-Uste, and Pokhodsk in the Sakha Republic, the Izhma-Komi reindeer herders of European Russia, and perhaps even the Pomor of the Russian Arctic. In Canada, cases may include the well-known Red River Métis, but also the Métis of the Maritimes (Acadien-Métis), those of Québec, as well as those of northern Canada.
Migrating and/as future-making [Commission on Migration]The panel focuses on individals as future-makers within the study of migration. Migrating individuals embark on a journey with certain aspirations. These imaginings of the future are not merely abstract products of the consciousness, but are expressed and embedded in people's present actions.migration, future, aspiration, good lifeAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Sophia Thubauville
Institution / affiliation: Frobenius Institute
City: Frankfurt
Country: Germany
Academic Degree: Professor
Name: Juan Bustamante
Institution / affiliation: University of Arkansas
City: Fayetteville
Country: USA
Academic Degree: MA
Name: Vinicius Kauê Ferreira
Institution / affiliation: École des Hautes Études de Sciences Sociales
City: Paris
Country: France
With a clear focus on the presence and the recent past, peoples’ futures and aspirations have been, until recently, neglected by studies in anthropology. However, as Appadurai stated rightly, humans are future-makers and future is a cultural fact. Appadurai’s call for anthropologists to investigate the future by describing people’s aspirations has received attention lately and brought forward a new debate on future anthropologies and the future in anthropology.
A good case to understand people as future-makers is the study of migration. Migrating individuals embark on a journey with certain aspirations. These imaginings of their future are not merely abstract products of their consciousness, but are, according to D'Onofrio, embodied and embedded in their present actions. Our panel wants to pay attention to exactly these actions of future-making. Presentations may include:
- Practices of saving/insuring
- Imaginations and working towards the “good life”
- Social mobility
- Precarity and downwards mobility
Morality, research, and the refugee crisisThe panel discusses moral values in research on and practice with refugees. We invite contributions on humanitarian responses to the 'refugee crisis,’ solidarity with immigrants, conflicts over values in relation to migration, and moral responsibilities of researchers, activists, and politicians.Refugee crisis, moral anthropology, research ethicsAcademic Degree: dr
Name: Izabella Main
Institution / affiliation: Center for Migraton Studies, Adam Mickiewicz University
City: Poznań
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: dr
Name: Brigitte Suter
Institution / affiliation: Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare, Malmö University
City: Malmö
Country: Sweden
Moral anthropology, aimed at studying the „moral making of the world” (Fassin, 2012), is a growing subfield of anthropological and ethnological sciences. Among other issues, moral anthropology addresses debates about values and emotions, moral duty and ethical freedom, and human rights and humanitarianism, including the responsibility of the researcher and the legal regulation of research in such undertakings. The European "refugee crisis," a term used to discuss the increased numbers of migrants arriving - by boats or overland - in the European Union beginning in 2015, is often considered a crisis of European response to the conflict in Syria and the resulting humanitarian crisis at the borders of Europe. The convenors would like to create a space to discuss the role of moral values in the „refugee crisis,” the integration challenges upon arrival in Europe, as well as anthropological research opportunities, limits and risks involved in studying people and social phenomena during humanitarian crises.

We invite researchers to address such topics as:
- humanitarian responses to refugee crises
- residents’ solidarity with immigrants
- conflicts over religious and secular values in relation to migration
- moral, social, and political responsibilities of researchers, activists, and politicians
- morality and moral values from different disciplinary perspectives in the social sciences and the humanities.
New Sacral Architecture in Modern European Cities [Commission on Urban Anthropology]New sacral buildings (temples, cultural-educational centers of different religions) change the image of European cities. The Panel will discuss modern architecture's concepts and problems of public perception, townspeople attitudes to “our” and “strange” sacred objects.modern sacral architecture, European cityAcademic Degree: Pref. ord., Dr hab.
Name: Swietlana Czerwonnaja
Institution / affiliation: Nicolaus Copernicus University, Prof.
City: Torun
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: Dr.
Name: Evgeny Kononenko
Institution / affiliation: State Institute for Art studies (Institut iskusstvoznanniya)
City: Moscow
Country: Russia
Academic Degree: Dr.
Name: Mieste Hottop-Riecke
Institution / affiliation: Institut für Caucasica-, Tatarica- und Turkestan-Studien im Zentrum für Kultur- und Kreativwirtschaft MagdeburgInstitut für Caucasica-, Tatarica- und Turkestan-Studien im Zentrum für Kultur- und Kreativwirtschaft Magdeburg
City: Magdeburg
Country: Germany
The emergence of new sacral objects (temples, memorial complexes, cultural-educational centers of different religions and confessions) in modern European cities causes sharp discussions and outlines new "hot spots" on the map of the European Continent.

The new sacral architecture is formed on the basis of a secondary sacralization, which comes in Europe, displacing the previous epoch of enlightenment, Laicism, "scientific atheism", secularization of all spheres of public life. There is a revival of mass religiosity, especially stormy in the countries of Eastern Europe freed from communist tyranny. Some cities experience a return illusions and traditions and an appeal to "spiritual roots" – to the religion of ancestors or fascination with new religious movements are accompanied by manifestation aspirations to create new sacral complexes. Side by side with the traditional "Christian" temples there are buildings that occupy a noticeable place, such as Islamic centers and mosques, Jewish synagogues, Buddhist temples, Baha’i, etc.

The panel invites papers on the development of modern architecture, its stylistic directions, traditionalist and innovative tendencies, as well problems of raised by how new sacred objects are received by the public. The papers will focus on evidence from the 20th and 21st centuries in the geographical borders of the European continent (including such countries as Russia, Turkey, Transcaucasien Republics). The Panel will develop a comparative analysis taking into account the historical heritage and the experience of the modern sacral architecture and town-planning. Papers that analyse ethnographic evidence beyond Europe are welcome.

Nomadic Peoples and the City [Commission for Nomadic Peoples]Our focus is on understanding how the city features in the study of contemporary mobile pastoralism, including forms of labor, forced settlement, aspirational migrations, gender, and marginalisation.This panel explores emerging trends related to nomadic peoples and citesurbanization, nomadic peoples, mobility, ethics, infrastructureAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Rebekah Plueckhahn
Institution / affiliation: University College London
City: London
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: MSc
Name: Stephen Lezak
Institution / affiliation: Oxford University
City: Oxford
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Giulia Gonzales
Institution / affiliation: University of Turin
City: Turin
Country: Italy
Urbanisation is changing the world we live in. With over 55% of humans now resident in urban areas, cities are more central than ever in the global political economy and production of cultural capital. Urbanisation takes on a particularly important role in societies with strong traditions of nomadism. In these contexts, rural to urban migration is inseparable from and often overlaps forms of sedentarisation and changing mobilities. These form reconfigurations of social and economic relationships that pose new challenges as pastoralists transition from the insecurities of nomadic herding to the precarity of urban labour. This, combined with differing forms of urban land tenure and access to housing is forming new problems and contradictions within urban spaces, giving rise to new forms of politics and urban ethics.

Our focus is on understanding how the city features in the study of contemporary mobile pastoralism, including forms of labor, forced settlement, aspirational migrations, gender, and marginalisation.This panel explores emerging trends related to nomadic peoples and cites. We are interested in the materiality of the city, rates of movement and change within cities themselves, the relationship between the urban and ‘development’, and the ways in which the city is entangled with rural identities and livelihoods. We hope that our engagement with urban spaces and nomadic livelihoods will unmask new insights into urban mobilities, that add to our understanding of wider dynamic urban-rural continuums and fast rates of urban change and growth seen elsewhere in the world that often surpass existing infrastructural provision.

Occupational Health Hazards and Public Health: An Anthropological InsightOccupational health has gradually developed from a mono-disciplinary to a multi-disciplinary approach that considers an individual’s physical, mental and social well-being. Present panel aimed at the anthropological insight on the occupational health hazards among the working population.Occupational Health Hazards , Public Health, Anthropological Insight , working populationAcademic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: AJEET JAISWAL
Institution / affiliation: DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY PONDICHERRY UNIVERSITY PUDUCHERRY INDIA
City: PONDICHERRY
Country: India
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: YENER BEKTAS
Institution / affiliation: Nevsehir Haci Bektas Veli University
City: Nevşehir, Turkey
Country: Turkey
Academic Degree: Ph.D
Name: J.B.Prashant More
Institution / affiliation: Institut des Hautes Etudes Economiques et Commerciales(Inseec), Paris
City: Paris
Country: France
Occupational health has gradually developed from a mono-disciplinary, risk- oriented activity to a multi-disciplinary and comprehensive approach that considers an individual’s physical, mental and social well-being, general health and personal development. The present panel aimed at highlighting the anthropological insight on the occupational health hazards among the working population. Nodoubt Occupational health aimed at the protection and promotion of the health of workers by preventing and controlling occupational diseases and accidents and by eliminating occupational factors and conditions hazardous to health and safety at work but still apart from the social atrocities, these working population are also exposed to many occupational health hazards like exposure to harmful gases, drowning, musculo skeletal disorders, infections, skin problems, respiratory system problem and cardiovascular degeneration. Present panel also discuss about management of toxic environment that came from working area and have direct effect on the health of the workers and also represent the important safety measures and safety guide for workers working in hazardous environment and also tries to explain about Training and prerequisite required.
Orthodox Christianity, social change and solidarity: Searching for new anthropological approachesOrthodox Christianity is faced with complex challenges posed by crisis situations and rapid social change. Studies of solidarity within Orthodoxy and their effect on political and economic rationalizations invites for revisiting the existing analytical frameworks in the anthropology of Christianity.Eastern Christianity, Social Change, Social Support, anthropology of ChristianityAcademic Degree: Dr.
Name: Tobias Köllner
Institution / affiliation: Witten/Herdecke University
City: Witetn
Country: Germany
Academic Degree: Dr.
Name: Agata Ladykowska
Institution / affiliation: Polish Academy of Sciences
City: Warsaw
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: Prof. Dr.
Name: Milena Benovska-Sabkova
Institution / affiliation: Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
City: Sofia
Country: Bulgaria
Orthodox Christianity is well known for presenting itself as a conservative force. Yet, Orthodox Christians and Orthodox Churches have been involved in a number of recent political, economic and social upheavals, notably in Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Middle East. A non-exhaustive list includes Greece’s economic and humanitarian crises, the danger of schism following the line of Russian-Ukrainian church conflict, Ukraine’s Maidan events, and the wars in Ukraine and the Middle East. More generally, contemporary Orthodox Christianity is faced with complex challenges posed by multiple crisis situations and rapid social changes.
Do struggles over power, resources and knowledge or the shifting patterns of nationalism, and globalization, operate as catalysts for the transformation of Eastern Orthodox Christianity? Are there specific forms of agency and solidarity emerging among Orthodox Christians within countries and across borders? If so, do they affect political or economic rationalizations as well, at micro- and macro levels?
Most of the analytical frameworks applied to the anthropological study of Christianity derive from studies of Protestantism and Roman Catholicism. It is the aim of this panel is to a) identify distinctive strategies of solidarity and tackling crises among Eastern Orthodox Christians; b) to revisit existing analytical frameworks and outline new conceptual tools of the anthropology of Christianity.
We invite proposals based on ethnographic fieldwork among Eastern Orthodox Christians, in settings where they constitute an absolute majority, but also in multi-religious and multi-cultural settings. We welcome also comparative case studies with Christian and other denominations.
Pastoralists and Resilience: Rethinking the Inside and Outside Perspectives of the Pastoral Communities [Commission of Nomadic Peoples]This panel takes a look at the dynamics of resilience amongst pastoralists. We look at the ways resilience is represented within pastoral development narratives and interventions, but also at the ways pastoralists themselves talk and act in relation to their own dynamics of vulnerability/resilience.resilience, pastoralist, development, climate change, vulnerabilityAcademic Degree: Ph D.
Name: Shinya Konaka
Institution / affiliation: University of Shizuoka
City: Shizuoka-shi
Country: Japan
Academic Degree: Ph D.
Name: Saverio Krätli
Institution / affiliation: Commission of Nomadic Peoples
City: East Sussex
Country: United Kingdom
This panel takes an anthropological look at the dynamics of resilience amongst pastoralists. Resilience in pastoral systems remains poorly defined, and mostly from the perspective of international development, i.e. from an outsider’s perspective’. Should we, as anthropologists, discard this concept as a buzzword or rather ‘own it’, adapting it to the discipline’s analytical and methodological tool-bag. In the latter case, we would need to question: what is actually happening in those processes/dimensions of pastoral systems currently analyzed by reference to the concept of resilience? Mainstream development narratives, now combined with climate-change arguments and predominantly neoliberal in their ideological orientation, frame pastoralists as ‘vulnerable’ social groups whose ‘resilience’ need enhancing. Pastoralists’ presumed lack of resilience is often associated with their mobile lifestyle, with mobility understood as a liability. This contradicts the ethnographic evidence that pastoralists specialize to make use of highly variable environments, and that identifies mobility as an adaptive strategy of production. Moreover, pastoralists themselves increasingly combine insiders’ and outsiders’ patterns of resilience while adapting to the new natural and artificial aspects of their productive environment, from development projects and increasingly aggressive markets, to climate change, sedentarization, and conflict. This panel looks at the ways resilience is represented within pastoral development discourses and interventions, but also at the ways pastoralists themselves talk and act in relation to their own dynamics of vulnerability/resilience. We are interested in exploring how these two perspectives overlap or diverge across a comparative sample.
Portraits of magical practitioners: An approach to the study of magic focusing on personsAlthough magic has been discussed by paying attention to words or practices, such dichotomy often misses the practitioner’s own viewpoint or experiences. This panel takes a new approach to magic, focusing on magical specialists and their character to describe the magical world as they understand it.magic, religious specialist, personality, experience, feelingAcademic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Fumihiko Tsumura
Institution / affiliation: Meijo University/ Professor
City: Nagoya
Country: Japan
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Prasirt Runra
Institution / affiliation: Thammasat University/ Lecturer
City: Bangkok
Country: Thailand
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Chihiro Shirakawa
Institution / affiliation: Osaka University/ Professor
City: Osaka
Country: Japan
This panel introduces a new approach to magic, focusing on the person who practices magic and describing the magical world as grasped by the specialist and other people.
Since the 1980s, the subject of “magic and modernity” has been discussed mainly in Africa, to investigate modern situations in which magical practices continue to be activated contradictorily. However, the discussion lacks a native point of view about how practitioners consider magic, and what they think and feel about it. As magic can bridge the cognitive gap between rationality and irrationality, or knowledge and practice, it must be analyzed not only through such dichotomies, but also by paying attention to other possibilities such as imagination, creativity, intuition, etc.
To overcome the familiar dichotomies, we concentrate on the person who conducts magical practices. When we compare magic with religion or science, each has its specialist (e.g., witch doctor, priest, scientist). However, the replaceability of the specialist differs highly in each case. While a scientific experiment can be replicated by another scientist, a magical ritual cannot be conducted by another witch doctor. Even though magic shows low replaceability of the practitioner, magical knowledge can be reproduced and maintained. Although the becoming process of specialists has been discussed, as with the famous episode of Quesalid of the Kwakwaka'wakw, their character or personality has rarely been studied. The presentations in this panel will focus on specialists’ words, body, character, intentions, and feelings to describe the magical world as grasped by them.
Pre-professional Career Practices of Tertiary Social Science Learners through Community EngagementThrough community engagement, the tertiary social science learners acquire graduate skills and personal efficacies that contribute to their present professional career. In professional career, learners find themselves well-equipped in raising people’s consciousness, and in making community good.Community Engagement, Graduate Skills, Personal Efficacies, Tertiary Education, Professional CareerAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: AHM Zehadul Karim
Institution / affiliation: Professor, Department of Anthropology, Jagannath University
City: Dhaka
Country: Bangladesh
Academic Degree: MA.MPhil,PhD
Name: Muzaffar Assadi
Institution / affiliation:Raichur University
City: Raichur
Country: India
The pedagogic method of community engagement strengthens the abilities of tertiary social science learners of the globe, and that of the community people in which they are engaged. They practice their learned conceptual and theoretical knowledge in the real world of community for securing a number of graduate skills, and personal efficacies. These graduate skills contribute to their present professional career. The learners’ engagement directly addresses and solves community needs and problems. The pre-professional career practices usually produce reciprocal gain of the Tertiary Social Science Education Organizations (TSSEOs) and their community laboratory through learners’ productive interactions and collaborative learning-service activities. It enhances learners’ social responsibility and makes them able to reciprocate their conceptual and theoretical knowledge with solving community’s everyday livelihood problems. The learners can secure practical knowledge and skills from the community people under the intensive guidance of teachers. And thus this service-learning method of community engagement is found very effective in integrating community people as the hub practical knowledge for both teachers and learners to TSSEOs. In fact the learners secure face-to-face knowledge about the nature of community’s enormous daily livelihood needs and their community-based strategies of solving those needs with their inadequate skills and scarce indigenous resources. In professional career, the learners find themselves well-equipped in raising people’s consciousness, and in making collective good of the community. The findings of this panel would guide the planners, policy-makers and development researchers in addressing pre-professional career skills through community engagement in their content of development policies and programs.
Problematics of Environment and pollution: Global scenarioProblematics of environmental pollution of various kinds and the exploitation of environment by humans has been a perpetual global concern since long, which could also entail natural or man made disasters. Possible solutions could be discussed about overcoming dangers to life on the planet.Environment, Pollution, Exploitation, Developed and Developing countriesAcademic Degree: Doctorate
Name: Trupti Hallikeri
Institution / affiliation: Karnatak University
City: Dharwad
Country: India
Academic Degree: Master/Maitrise
Name: Roberto Perin
Institution / affiliation: Glendon College
City: Toronto
Country: Canada
This panel touches upon the environment and the various kinds of pollution which have been perpetual problematics of disposal of waste and restoration of environment. The problematics in this context could be addressed in terms of the developed and the developing countries over the globe resulting probably with the exploitation of some by a few nations, or some contributing largely by way of pollution when compared to the others and the like. Along with the environmental destruction several consequential dangers could be extinction of species, inclusive of health hazards, depletion of natural resources, rising of temperatures, chemical pollutants in air, water and land, natural and man made disasters etc. This panel could also review the possible solutions of tackling the problematics of the above mentioned problems.
Protect Indigenous cultural heritage for Survival (commission on museum and cultural heritage).Protect Indigenous cultural heritage for Survival: Indigenous knowledge related to socio-economic activities of the Indigenous communities for Survival and existence . Thus in local and global levels require to protect the Indigenous cultural heritage and it's solidarity.1 .Indigenous Knowledge 2.protection 3. Solidarity in local and global levels.Academic Degree: Ph.D
Name: Satya Narayan Munda
Institution / affiliation: Dr. Shyama Prasad Mukherjee University, Ranchi.
City: Ranchi
Country: India
Academic Degree: Ph.D
Name: Mohan Kant Gautam
Institution / affiliation: European University of West and East
City: Netherlands
Country: Netherlands
Protect Indigenous cultural heritage for Survival: Indigenous knowledge related to social, economic, cultural, religious, educational life of the Indigenous communities.It also relates to agriculture, shifting cultivation, hunting, food gathering, fishing, pastoralism, basket making, rope making, iron melting, drumming etc.Its practices also relates to Survival of nature and animal kingdom. Thus in local and global levels require to protect the Indigenous cultural heritage and it's solidarity.
Psychedelic Anthropology in the Age of Global Mental HealthIn the age of Global Mental Health, this panel seeks to bring forth discussion of how the use of mind-altering substances and practices are emerging into the mainstream as increasingly socially acceptable forms of alternative mental healthcare.Mental health, psychedelics, traditional medicine, global mental healthAcademic Degree: MPH, PhD candidate
Name: Olivia Marcus
Institution / affiliation: University of Connecticut
City: Storrs
Country: USA
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Beatriz Labate
Institution / affiliation: California Institute for Integral Studies
City: San Francisco
Country: USA
Academic Degree: MA
Name: Adam Aronovich
Institution / affiliation: Universitat de Barcelona
City: Barcelona
Country: Spain
In the 1960s Allan D. Coult emerged as a notably loud proponent of what he called Psychedelic Anthropology. His post-humous Psychedelic Anthropology is a text that reflected the general trend in anthropology to uncover the ‘predicament of humankind’ or what it means to be human and experience altered states of consciousness. His focus in founding the International Society for Psychedelic Anthropology was to explore human and culture and behavior through the insights of psychedelic experiences, which he maintained was essential for anthropological inquiry. Since then, anthropologists have written on traditional uses of mind-altering rituals (e.g., fasting, dancing, drumming), plants (e.g., ayahuasca, mescaline, salvia divinorum, iboga), fungi, and animal exudates (e.g. Kambo). Currently, in an era of rising mental health concerns in which global rates of depression, anxiety, symptoms of post-traumatic stress, and addiction are coming to the forefront of global health concerns, anthropological knowledge of ‘traditional’ uses are perhaps becoming superseded by investigations concerning practices bound up with New Age beliefs, neo-shamanism, and hybridized or syncretic forms in which the traditional collaborates, integrates, and clashes with western psychology and biomedicine. This panel invites researchers who peer into these spaces of hybridization, syncretism, collaboration, and disjuncture to discuss the current state of anthropological knowledge that is bound up in the use of psychedelics. Further, in the age of Global Mental Health, this panel seeks to bring forth discussion of how the use of mind-altering substances and practices are emerging into the mainstream as increasingly socially acceptable forms of alternative mental healthcare.
Regimes of care, gender and reproduction: solidarities and contestations across bordersThe question of intimate care has become increasingly important and contested in the current era, as have issues of social and biological reproduction. Both areas generate solidarity and contestation, moral and legal, and involve movement across geo-political or ideological borders, or both.Care, Reproduction, Gender, Borders, MigrationAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Frances Pine
Institution / affiliation: Goldsmiths, University of London
City: London
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Haldis Haukanes
Institution / affiliation: University of Bergen
City: Bergen
Country: Norway
The question of intimate care - care of the elderly, of children, and of the ill or frail- has become increasingly important and contested in the current era of decline of the welfare state, greater longevity, and an increasingly aging population in Europe and North America. Issues concerning social and biological reproduction have equally grown in complexity, with both contestation, moral and legal, around pregnancy termination, and around assisted reproduction technologies. Both of these areas, intimate care and reproduction, increasingly involve movement across geo-political or ideological borders, or both. A shortage of care workers in the north and the west has been largely met by employment of migrant workers, usually from the south and the east. Laws regulating ARTs and reproductive rights similarly lead to movement across geo-political borders, as women travel abroad in search of safe abortion facilities, or reproductive assistance. On the ideological level, these movements and migrations challenge ideological borders - between kin and strangers in the provision of intimate care, between things which should be given freely, and altruistically, out of kin love, and things for which one can demand a price or payment, between individuals' rights over their bodies and moral ideas concerning the sanctity of all human life. In this panel we aim to explore connections and disjunctures which are played out over different kinds of borders in relation to care, gender and reproduction. We welcome papers dealing with any aspects of these questions.


Religions in Latin America: continuities and rupturesThis panel will discuss empirical and theoretical contributions that seek to describe and analyze the present scenario of religions in Latin America, considering their multiple interfaces and aspects.Latin American Religions, Anthropology of Religion, Popular ReligionsAcademic Degree: Dr.
Name: Amurabi Oliveira
Institution / affiliation: Federal University of Santa Catarina
City: Florianópolis
Country: Brazil
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Roberto Mauro Cortez Motta
Institution / affiliation: Federal University of Pernambuco
City: Recife
Country: Brazil
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Renata Siuda-Ambroziak
Institution / affiliation: University of Warsaw
City: Warsaw
Country: Poland
The field of Latin American religions has been marked by continuous and intense transformations in recent years. These include massive conversions to Pentecostal churches, a marked decline in the number of Catholics,and the so-called process of re-Africanization of Afro-Brazilian religions, besides the rearrangement of the relationship between the local and global levels in religions. In addition, entirely new forms of religious expression have been emerging on the continent. These issues have launched theoretical and methodological challenges of a first magnitude for researchers in the field of the social sciences of religion. This panel will discuss empirical and theoretical contributions that seek to describe and analyze the present scenario of religions in Latin America, considering their multiple interfaces and aspects, like religion and politics, religion and gender, popular religions, new religions and religiosities, etc..
Researching Pastoral Solidarities: Exploring Methods and Frameworks [Commission on Nomadic Peoples]Today contexts of pastoral livelihoods challenge conventional research methodologies. The panel explores new frameworks and epistemologies; units of reference; tools and methods to better fit current empirics of mobile pastoralism at the nexus between ecologies and inequalities of representationpastoralism, methodologies, knowledge, innovationAcademic Degree: DPhil candidate
Name: Greta Semplici
Institution / affiliation: University of Oxford
City: Oxford
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Erika Grasso
Institution / affiliation: University of Turin
City: Turin
Country: Italy
Inspired by the platform “pastoralism methodologies”, we call for abstracts which challenge underlying assumptions of conventional research methodologies when applied to the study of mobile pastoralists. The urge to work on research methodologies derives from an identified gap in literature. Renewed theoretical understandings of both rangeland ecology and pastoral strategies, have in fact remained unfollowed by discussions about what methods we apply when researching mobile people. Out of this gap, ‘scientific facts’ are produced and used by policy-makers, even though these may not be methodologically sound for the contemporary contexts of mobile people. It is therefore crucial to ask ourselves: What particular issues and challenges are found in these contexts? How can knowledge be produced in places of high variabilities? What is the role of new technology such as mobile phones or social media platforms, and other innovations, in the study of pastoralist mobilities? We call for contributions around three focal points for the development of research methodologies: (1) framework and epistemologies, including what understanding of the world shall be portrayed and how knowledge shall be produced in pastoral settings; (2) what data to collect, including current challenges within conventional units of reference and what solutions proposed; and (3) how to collect data, including issues of ethics, positionalities, and technological innovations. The goal is to prompt reflections on our language, our units of analysis, geographical and spatial references, tools and methods adopted, and broader research design to better fit the empirics of researching with mobile people.
Rethinking the Relationships between Real Societies and CyberspacesWe are using online data as useful showcases of real societies. The type of relationship between the two, however, depends on the case. We would investigate ethnographic studies of the gaps between online and offline socialities, to explore the theoretical core of the relationship.online ethnography, alternative socialities, cyberspacesAcademic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Shimpei Ota
Institution / affiliation: National Museum of Ethnology, Japan
City: Suita, Osaka
Country: Japan
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Martin Petersen
Institution / affiliation: National Museum of Denmark
City: Copenhagen
Country: Denmark
Social sciences have a tendency, more or less, to distinguish cyberspaces from the real societies; some researchers deal with cyberspaces as a cluster of samples or as the interacting significant other of the real societies, while the others argue the two are more on skew lines, never to totally cross one another. However, now that online communication has become an indispensable part of offline relationships, we are being required to count more various patterns of relationships between the two. (Refer to Daniel Miller's online-based research project "Why we post.")

This panel takes presentations on case studies of South Korean socio-cultures, especially under consideration. South Korea's connection to the Internet already took eleventh place in the world in 2017, but it is still growing most rapidly among the top fifteens. Another significant feature of Korean cyberspaces is that it is strongly tied with the monolingual culture whose socio-cultures are strongly integrated. By focusing on it, it would become more effective to discuss on the ties between the online and the offline.

Presentations that focus on different areas will also be welcome. Comparing with each other's environment and conclusion, this panel will be getting close to our goal, a theoretical brainstorming, not ending up as a series of miscellaneous online ethnographies.
Sensory anthropology and new urban commonsThe panel will address experiences of constant changes in urban environment and embodied sensorial memories and experience of public spaces as new commons. How might mobile ethnographic methodologies provide new understanding of public life and sensed shifts in technology-saturated environments?sensory anthropology, commons, urban environmentAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Rajko Mursic
Institution / affiliation: University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Arts, Dept. of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology
City: Ljubljana
Country: Slovenia
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Inkeri Aula
Institution / affiliation: University of Eastern Finland
City: Turku
Country: Finland
The panel will address experience of constant changes in urban environment and inducement of embodied sensorial memories by walking. Could walking ethnography, such as the method of sensobiographic walk developed by Helmi Järviluoma, provide new approaches for studying public life and experienced shifts in urban environments?

The increased mobility both of people and of things, such as the everyday mobile technology, is changing our environments and the experience of place. This panel asks, how are personal memories maintained sensorially in changed or new environments. We are looking for approaches to how can different senses be considered in anthropological research of experiencing temporal change in local environments. Mobile digital devices also mediate significantly the ways of relating with the environment through fast sharing of photos and video clips in social media, or following route tips and map applications.
Can sensorial approach provide better understanding of changing and technology-saturated spaces? The social aspects of technically mediated relationship with the surrounding (urban) space calls for novel anthropological insights, especially in terms of continuous production of common experience, generation, after generation, accumulating new urban commons.

We invite papers based on sensorial-ethnographic approaches related to urban anthropological research, experiential understanding of the public, old and new commons, experience of space and place, technological mediation of the environment, and mobile research methods that explore some form of moving through space. The session articulates methodological perspectives developed as part of a ERC funded project 'Sensory Transformations and Transgenerational Environmental Relationships in Europe, 1950–2020: SENSOTRA' (grant no. 694893).
Social Exclusion and Discrimination in HealthSocial discrimination in health is subtle and leads to oversight of its presence. Understanding health inequalities need to be relocated in the framework of poverty. Psychosocial approach to inequities would highlight the processes that perpetuate historical deprivation affecting healthDiscrimination, health care access, resources, deprivationAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Sanghmitra Sheel Acharya
Institution / affiliation: Jawaharlal Nehru University
City: New Delhi
Country: India
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Maisam Najafizada
Institution / affiliation Memorial University of Newfoundland
City: St. John's
Country: Canada
India is one of the most unequal countries both in terms of income as well as social indicators. Poor, most of whom are from Dalits, tribes (especially, denotified) and religious minorities, expereince discrimination in access to resources, services and opportunities in various spheres and in varied forms. Provisioning of health care services has been elugised as a nobel profession where differentiation on the basis of social identities is absent. However, in a diverse country like India, a labyrinth of identities based on caste, ethnicity, religion, region, language, political affiliation actively lend to the propensities which evolve for the utilisation of services. Historical deprivation in case of some, exclude them, while the privileges accrued to some others put them at an advantaged positon for accessing resources. Health care responds to such revelation only when inequality framework is revisited in the light of inequity. The idea of poverty has to be reexamined vis-a-vis restricted access to resources consequent of social impoverishment. While largescale data have reported on the inequalities, micro level studies have reported the differential treatment meted out to care users based on their social ideintities. Grassroots level workers providing healthc are have been observed to be more discrimiantory as comapred to the ones at the higher level of higher level of heirarchy of the health care. Thus is it imperative to table the issues which pepetuate historical deprivation anf furhtet marginalise the socially excluded groups from access to ehalthc are services.
Solidarities and policies to reduce HIV/AIDS [Commission of Anthropology of HIV/AIDS]Certain target groups may not be addressed or be excluded de facto from HIV policies (i.e. migrants or MSM). We propose to share professional experiences and discuss approaches and solidarities in the fight against HIV/AIDS, focusing on gender and culturally appropriate policies and recommendationspolicies, culture and gender sensitivity, solidarities, sharingAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Anita Nudelman
Institution / affiliation: Ben Gurion University
City: Beer Sheva
Country: Israel
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Paul Nchoji Nkwi
Institution / affiliation: Catholic University of Cameroon
City: Bamenda
Country: Cameroon
Policies to reduce HIV/AIDS at international and national levels are usually based on various types of collaborations and solidarities, such as H6 Partnerships Vision between international organizations to achieve results by 2020, Building Faith-based Partnerships and the “90-90-90” to help end the AIDS epidemic (UNAIDS).
At the country level, official policies, as well as informal local ways of addressing the epidemic exist. Although “health for all” and respect of human rights are universally acclaimed, different target groups and populations are often not addressed directly by policies or are de facto excluded from them, as in the case with migrants and asylum seekers. In addition, due to cultural issues or discrimination, other groups, such as MSM and transgender populations, may be discouraged from accessing services. However, these gaps are sometimes reduced through culture and gender sensitive and projects initiated by international organizations, NGOs and/or civil society.
In a global world, lessons learned from successful activities and interventions can be shared with other communities and countries, and eventually even adopted by policy makers. In addition, solidarities and sharing of knowledge, technologies and prevention programs occur across countries.
Therefore, the proposed panel will be a platform to share professional experiences and discuss a wide range of approaches and world solidarities targeted towards the fight against HIV/AIDS, focusing on gender and culturally appropriate policies and recommendations.
Solidarities between the state and local community in revitalization of old urban cores [WCAA Global Cultural Policies Task Force and IUAES Commission on Enterprise Anthropology]The panel explores formal and informal solidarities between state institutions and local community groups and individuals that take part in urban redevelopment projects. Emphasis is on solidarities that bring about traditional and yet sustainable open public space uses and business activities.urban revitalization, state and local community, formal and informal solidarities, open public space, business activitiesAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Vesna Vucinic Neskovic
Institution / affiliation: University of Belgrade
City: Belgrade
Country: Serbia
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: JiJiao Zhang
Institution / affiliation: Chinese Academy of Social Sciences
City: Beijing
Country: China
Renewal projects aimed at reconstructing old urban cores and revitalizing life in them are complex undertakings with multiple actors. In most cases, the state at different levels of administration (starting from federal to regional and municipal, down to local institutions) initiates such projects and fully or partially funds them. These projects are part of urban and spatial plans of different order and are implemented under varied policies and legal regulations, which impose certain rules of land use, zoning, construction, negotiation, relocation, business stimulation, social work, etc. At the same time, various non-state actors, especially business enterprises, non-governmental organizations, citizens’ and neighborhood associations and groups, as well as concerned individuals, take part in the process. This panel would like to invite researchers that will present and discuss various kinds of partnerships, or rather formal and informal solidarities between the state institutions and local communities. Our interest is to discuss how such solidarities can contribute to positive and negative outcomes of inner city renewal projects. Another words, we want to explore how ethnology, anthropology and related disciplines may be useful in making the future of redeveloped cities, showing how the state can stimulate or respond to initiatives of other actors engaged in the process. We are especially interested in solidarities that bring about vibrant open public space activities and business establishment activities that at the same time preserve the old urban traditions, but also serve as generators of good life and sustainable urban development.
Solidarities, the Need to Belong and Social Disruption [Commission on Urban Anthropology (CUA)]The implicit concern here is the problem of immigration and of perceived intruders and populist reactions against it and why it has taken this form and the failure of established elites to understand it and grasp the nature of the problem.Immigrants, perceived intruders, social bonds, social disruption, xenophobiaAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Marcello Mollica
Institution / affiliation: University of Messina
City: Messina
Country: Italy
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: James Dingley
Institution / affiliation: Queens' University Belfast
City: Belfast
Country: United Kingdom
Academia and liberal politicians failed to recognise the importance of existing social ethno-national and religious solidarities and they underestimated reactions to immigrant groups lacking their identities. This reflects a neo-liberal, post-structural failure to grasp mans’ social nature and real need to belong to identifiable social groups with shared features, creating a sense of continuity whereby individuals can negotiate a meaningful life.
This poses a critique of neo-liberalism and market economics with their self-referential assumptions of autonomous, atomised individuals, uprooted from the social. We need to relocate man as a social being, understanding the ontological role that culture plays in society, located today in the nation-state. Hence, the rise of right-wing, anti-immigrant, anti-EU, anti-globalisation sentiments is borne from a failure to address the non-economic realities of being.
The contemporary left, which used to appreciate these problems has almost disappeared and liberals are too radically individualistic to cope with social realities, which leaves right-wing xenophobes free to exploit nationalist anxieties. This should be classic territory for social scientists, except that post-modern/critical theory equally rejects the importance of socio-cultural cohesion, unlike the founders of social science.
Submissions are welcomed from scientists working on urban, contested settings able to help understanding the resentment of natives opposed to immigrants and perceived intruders and able to move away from the rhetoric of irrationality. Bigotry often lies in rational concerns and politicians fail when they cannot grasp that politically correct ‘liberal’ stances leave the field open for xenophobes to exploit, this is often magnified in urban loci.
Solidarity and consecrated lifeThe forms of consecrated life in many religious and spiritual traditions tend to establish solidaristic communities. How is this solidarity conceptualized and lived? What are the (solidaristic) ties of consecrated communities to the outer world?religious / spiritual communities; consecrated life; solidaristic tiesAcademic Degree: PhD.
Name: Barbora Spalová
Institution / affiliation: Faculty of social sciences Charles University Prague
City: Krompach
Country: Czechia
Academic Degree: PhD.
Name: Marcin Jewdokimow
Institution / affiliation: Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw (Faculty of Humanities)
City: Warsaw
Country: Poland
The forms of consecrated life such as monasticism (Christian, Buddhist, Jain etc.), religious orders, neo-monastic communities, (grass-root) spiritual communities, and other that incorporate elements of consecrated life such as Taize Community or ISCON, International Society for Krishna Consciousness produce the necessity of interconnectedness and binding concepts creating the solidaristic bonds not only inside the communities but also with the external environment. We shall begin with the questions such as how are the communities of consecrated life constructed and performed in everyday life? What is the relation of solidarity or similar concepts to the regimes of power and authority inside the communities? How important are the solidaristic bonds for the spirituality or religiosity of the communities? How important are the solidaristic bonds for the spirituality or religiosity of the communities?
The panel will further elaborate on the connections between the lived solidarity inside the communities and the character of ties toward the so called “outer world”. The ideology and practice of the concepts such as ministry, social work, charity, stewardship, mission, prayer, pastoral work, evangelization, spiritual service, values preservation and transmission etc. which correspond to the multilayered ties between the communities of consecrated life and the “outer world” will be carefully scrutinized in the particular social contexts and transculturally compared.
We invite papers empirically as well as theoretically focusing on the problem of solidarities in and outside the communities of consecrated life.
Solidarity in times of (in)securitySecurity plays a key role in debates around current crises. Contradictions / combinations between security-based and solidarity-based organization unsettle such debates in complex ways. The panel seeks empirically informed contributions aiming at theorizing the nexus between solidarity and security.(in)security, global crises, immigration, welfare, climateAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Ana Ivasiuc
Institution / affiliation: Justus Liebig University
City: Giessen
Country: Germany
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Agnes Gagyi
Institution / affiliation: University of Gothenburg
City: Gothenburg
Country: Sweden
In the context of current multiple global crises, a new tide of militarization promises security, providing a recognition of individual value based on belonging to protected groups. Multiple forms of grassroots and cross-class organizations operate this aspect of solidarity, often beyond territories covered by official security policies. Meanwhile, initiatives running counter to militarization and securitization propose a notion of security based on solidarity. For example, the Refugees Welcome initiative in Germany aims at fostering solidarity with refugees amidst societal debates on the insecurity that refugees are seen to cause. The Transition movement promotes a politics towards the climate crisis based in preference for local systems of mutual help, instead of top-down security measures. The centrality of security in current debates about climate, immigration, or economic welfare tends to obscure its silent pendant – the force of solidarity. The theorization of the complex nexus between solidarity and security in current reactions to global crises might be a major anthropological contribution to understanding and dealing with current crises.

The panel aims at examining the relationship between security and solidarity, asking:
- How do solidarities emerge and function in an age of (in)security, and how do they change or undermine practices and discourses of (in)security?
- How do rationalities of solidarity and rationalities of security stand in contrast, opposition, or complementarity to each other, or, more ambiguously, in complicity with each other?

We seek ethnographically informed cases which discuss these and other connex issues, aiming at theorizing the nexus between security and solidarity.
Solidarity through sport: Contemporary faces of “the gift”? [IUAES-Sports & IUAES-Tourism]This panel examines how ideas of solidarity are manifested in the context of sports. We are particularly interested in exploring the forms of solidarity taking shape through processes of commercialisation and institutionalisation of sports-related charity events, “gifts” and development programmes.Sport, charity, gift (Mauss), development, tourismAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Noel B. Salazar
Institution / affiliation: University of Leuven
City: Leuven
Country: Belgium
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Carmen Rial
Institution / affiliation: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina
City: Santa Catarina
Country: Brazil
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Tarminder Kaur
Institution / affiliation: University of the Free State
City: Bloemfontein
Country: Republic of South Africa
Solidarity in/through sports is as old as the contemporary idea of sports itself. With the rise of professional, commercial and globally televised sports, the meanings, intentions and politics for which solidarity is sought are more diverse, complex and rife with internal contradictions. Under the banner of “Sports for Development and Peace”, spearheaded by the United Nations and the International Olympic Committee, there exists a plethora of initiatives: from non-governmental organisations using sports to meet particular development goals to individuals taking on sports challenges, both as participants and/or endorsers, to raise funds and awareness for a range of causes. The “gift” of time, effort and/or material seemingly suggests that greater good can be achieved while having fun, an adventure, for the sake of better health, or simply to get involved in a community activity. So-called charity challenges also feed into tourism of a particular kind. And then there are charitable initiatives established and promoted by sports celebrities, in the form of foundations or sports academies or schools for youth, as a way of giving back (a counter-gift) to (often poor) communities. What are these activities all about? What do they tell us about the changing societal trends in sports, health and leisure? What are the conditions of these growing phenomena shaped by or responding to (e.g. the shrinking welfare state, tax-benefits and neoliberal ideologies)? What is the role of medical science and old and new media in all of this? These and other questions will be addressed by the panel.
Solidarity with whom? Processes of defining solidarity with sex workersIn this panel we will discuss ethnographically informed contributions that demonstrate how the needs of and care for sex workers are negotiated in interactions between sex workers, activists, institutions, and other actors, and how these interactions might be translated into political action.sex work, activism, institutions, supportAcademic Degree: M.A.
Name: Ursula Probst
Institution / affiliation: Freie Universität Berlin
City: Berlin
Country: Germany
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Pawel Lewicki
Institution / affiliation: Europa-Universität Viadrina
City: Frankfurt/Oder
Country: Germany
Academic Degree: MPH
Name: Megan Schmidt-Sane
Institution / affiliation: Case Western Reserve University
City: Cleveland, Ohio
Country: USA
“How can one be in solidarity with sex workers?” – is a question repeatedly asked in discussions of sex work, as common public portrayals of sex workers as either helpless victims of unspeakable crimes or independent workers put in danger by discriminatory legislation plus social stigmatization make it difficult to find common grounds for solidarity with sex workers. Further, these lived realities are more multifaceted than the publicly available melodramatic (Vance, 2012) images of sex work.

To answer this question, we want to take a step back and use this panel to discuss how, when, and where the need for solidarity with or care for sex workers is evoked and why. We invite ethnographically informed contributions that show how the (supposed) needs of sex workers are negotiated in everyday interactions between sex workers, activists, institutions, support services, and other actors, and how these interactions might be translated into political action. We will focus on interactions that inform a broader discussion on the legal and policy context of sex work, rather than sex work and service provision. We also want to discuss who gets included in or excluded from these conversations and how legal and practical frameworks on different scales shape the opportunities of sex workers to voice their own needs and to be heard. Acknowledging the role of academia in these discussions we also invite papers that critically reflect on the role and impact of sex work research and the potentials of creating solidarities between researchers and sex workers.
Solidarity: Interaction among different ethnic groups in the urban contextThis panel explores the adaptive culture among the different communities in the multi-ethnic countries in the world.: Urbanization, migration, ethnic, interaction, adaptiveAcademic Degree: Ph.D in Anthropology
Name: Dr.Mrs. Sumita Chaudhuri
Institution / affiliation: Retired UGC Research Scientist
City: Kolkata
Country: India
The rapid urbanization of the present times is a worldwide phenomenon. Cities are part of the larger societies and are in a constant process of internal change, growing as a result of both birth and migration. The role of migration in the context of social change and economic development is an important factor. Moreover, inter-regional migration has a very crucial role to play in the process of industrialization and urbanization mainly in the developing nations.
Inter-ethnic relations in the multi-ethnic societies of the developing world are in a fluid state because of two processes: 1) the process of modernization which provides incentives and opportunities for mobility, and creates the conditions for increasing internal migration; and 2) consequent to such a process there is the growth of ethnic identification and ethnic cohesion as nurtured by modernization.
The different communities of megacities in the multi-ethnic countries may exhibit highly structural exclusiveness on the one hand, but on the other, there may be a tendency to influence each other for natural adaptation and adjustment. In this situation, there is a possibility that an adaptive culture is adopted, whereby anyone can survive through interaction.
Southern anthropological solidarities: Latin American agendaThe Latin American anthropological community seen as an specific territory of academic articulation and research, strengthened by binding events and associative institutional solidarities. System that allows creating an agenda with topics of necessary visibility in the global context.Latin American anthropology, southern solidarities, anthropological associations, anthropological eventsAcademic Degree: Professional
Name: Lydia de Souza
Institution / affiliation: AUAS/ALA
City: Montevideo
Country: Uruguay
Academic Degree: Doctor
Name: Betty Francia
Institution / affiliation: UDELAR/AUAS
City: Montevideo
Country: Uruguay
Academic Degree: Anthropologist
Name: Lía Ferrero
Institution / affiliation: Health and sports
City: CABA
Country: Argentina
Latin American anthropology has been recognized in themes that present particularities as an articulated territorial and political system. In this sense, binding events, such as the Mercosur Anthropology Meetings (RAM) or the National Anthropology Congresses that attract colleagues from the region, have allowed them to create their own research lines. We can even identify a South-South anthropology that is making its way, as is the Uruguayan case. To these links has been added the institutional map of the Associations of Anthropology that, under the umbrella of the Latin American Association of Anthropology (ALA), allows to think in a critical anthropology and always contextualized in current social scenarios, strengthening academic solidarity and with the interacting societies. It is a specific dynamic of Latin America, in appropriate times and spaces, that transits conflicts and singularities that are reflected in the anthropological academic production. We believe that it is essential to approach these realities of our anthropological community that often appears distant for the anthropologies of other parts of the planet, a vision without which the theoretical, methodological and practical baggage of our discipline would be incomplete.
Sport, Indigeneity and Globalization [Commission on the Anthropology on Sports]The panel aims to discuss the relation between sport, sporting events, and Indigenous peoples whithin the concepts of globalization, ethnoemancipation, indigenization, sportization and trans-indigenism. It also deals with ongoing debates about the role of sport in cross-cultural understanding.Indigeneity, Sport, Transnationalism, GlobalizationAcademic Degree: PHD
Name: Livia Savelkova
Institution / affiliation: University of Pardubice
City: Pardubice
Country: Czechia
Academic Degree: PHD
Name: Zuzanna Kruk-Buchowska
Institution / affiliation: Adam Mickiewicz University
City: Poznan
Country: Poland
In 2010, the Haudenosaunee national lacrosse team was not allowed to enter the United Kingdom with their Haudenosaunee passports to participate in the World Fieldlacrosse Championship. This denial brought media interest to the role of sports for Indigenous societies, issues of sovereignty and international sport solidarity.

During the last decades, Indigenous peoples have had a significant impact on the shape of global sport – Maori and other Polynesian players have influenced the rugby world and Samoan players – American football (Horton 2012, Uperesa and Mountjoy 2014). Although games of Indigenous peoples have been described by scholars since the founding of anthropology in the 19th century (Mooney 1890, Culin 1907), the role of sports for Indigenous societies has become ever more visible today due to the growing global forces impacting it. Relatively recently, both the local and transnational contexts of Indigenous sports have become the subjects of an increased interest of scholars (c.f. Hallinan and Judd 2013 for general context; Downey 2018; Forsyth and Giles 2013 for Native Americans; Foster 2006; Leach and Kildea 1976 for Trobriand Islanders; Light and Evans JR 2018; Tatz and Adair 2009; for Australian Aboriginal peoples; Krasilnikov 2015 for Khanty).
This panel invites submissions from scholars who are concerned with any form of anthropological and ethnological research dealing with various forms of indigenization and glocalization of sport, sportization of Indigenous games, the role of sports in ethnoemancipation, representation, impacts of world sport events on local Indigenous societies and transnational global Indigenous identity.

States of Exception: Policy and Politics in Exceptional TimesThis panel explores the work of states of emergency. What are the characteristics of governing through emergencies? Whose interests do emergencies serve? What new kinds of subjects and relation do states of exception create? How do people engage with, or respond to, such states of emergency?States of emergency, exception, governance, power, lawlessnessAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Cris Shore
Institution / affiliation: Goldsmiths University of London
City: London
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: MA
Name: Cansu Civelek
Institution / affiliation: University of Vienna
City: Vienna
Country: Austria
In recent decades, particularly since 9/11, anthropologists, social scientists, and legal studies scholars have become increasingly interested in the theme of governing in and through emergencies, often drawing on Georgio Agamben’s (2005) and Carl Schmitt’s notion of ‘state of exception’. What these studies share is a concern with scrutinizing sovereign power by investigating state interventions into the rule of law, restrictions on jurisdiction, suspension of human and citizenship rights, militarization, surveillance, and constitutional dictatorships emerging from declarations of state of exception. In addition to formal declarations of exception, however, neoliberal policy agendas, the crisis of democracy, and the proliferation of declarations of urgency and emergency suggest that in many places the ‘state of emergency’ has become the new normal. Whether it be environmental catastrophes, wars, economic crises, or political unrest, governments, public-sector institutions, private bodies and not-for-profit organizations all utilize crises and emergencies to justify making ‘exceptional’ interventions into the domains of policy and law. In some contexts, ruling by decrees has become a governing practice that has blurred the relationship between policy-making, laws, and the concept of due process.
We invite contributions that unravel the way interventions under states of emergency provide opportunities for the accumulation of wealth and power, or dispossession, marginalization and exclusion.
- What are the characteristics of governing in and through emergencies?
- Whose interests do emergencies serve?
- What new kinds of subjects and relation do states of exception create?
- How do people engage with, or respond to, such states of emergency?
Teaching and Learning Anthropology [IUAES Commission on Anthropology and Education]How is anthropology being taught and learned around the world? We warmly invite papers which explore the similarities and differences between the teaching and learning of anthropology in schools, colleges, universities, adult education centres, extra-curricular events and independent study.Education, Teaching, Learning, PedagogyAcademic Degree: M.A., Ph.D.
Name: Kevin Purday
Institution / affiliation: University of Cape Town
City: Cape Town
Country: Republic of South Africa
Academic Degree: B.Sc., B.Litt., D.Phil
Name: Joy Hendry
Institution / affiliation: Oxford Brookes retired
City: Tillicoultry
Country: United Kingdom
How is anthropology being taught and learned around the world? We warmly invite papers which give examples of the similarities and differences between the teaching and learning of anthropology in schools, colleges, universities, adult education centres, extra-curricular events and for independent study.

How are people introducing anthropology to students new to the subject and why are they taking this approach? Is anthropology part of schooling in your country or is it only found at the university level? Are formal anthropology qualifications offered, or are there elements of anthropology in other subject areas? What formal and informal learning opportunities exist for different age groups? How do students and independent learners encounter anthropological themes? What forms of syllabi, course content and pedagogy are being used by teachers? What branches of anthropology are represented? What wider social contexts influence the opportunities for educational outreach and engagement? Papers could discuss teaching anthropological topics or teaching using an anthropological approach. What connections exist between anthropology education and literacy, wellbeing, bilingual education and teaching about local culture and traditions? What skills are associated with an education in anthropology? How exactly do students learn about ethnographic examples and anthropological theory?

Technology + Pollution + Damage + Uncertainty = EthnographyThis panel foregrounds narratives of contamination and suffering in sites of environmental damage, as well as the ethnographic methods critical to interpreting discourses of uncertainty at the intersection of powerful technologies and vulnerable bodies and ecologies.environmental damage, invisible threats, uncertainty, victims’ narratives, ethnographyAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Satoe Nakahara
Institution / affiliation: Research Institute for Humanity and Nature
City: Kyoto
Country: Japan
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Cristina LARREA KILLINGER
Institution / affiliation: University of Barcelona
City: Barcelona
Country: Spain
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Peter Wynn KIRBY
Institution / affiliation: University of Oxford
City: Oxford
Country: United Kingdom
Health damage from pollution, radiation, and toxic living environments creates ponderous uncertainty within communities. Such environmental health threats, often invisible and unmeasurable without recourse to specialized scientific instruments, not only weigh on victims but complicate attempts to prove causality and blame. Fractured communities riven by divergent exposure, vested interests, socioeconomic difference, and battles between rival dossiers of scientific evidence bear witness to the difficulties of litigating victimhood. Added to which, campaigns for justice over environmental suffering create pressures to translate personal experience and cultural difference into terms acceptable to transnational NGOs and global environmental activism, with sometimes ambivalent results.



This panel foregrounds narratives of contamination and suffering in sites of environmental damage, as well as the ethnographic methods critical to accessing, eliciting, recording, and communicating discourses of uncertainty at the intersection of powerful 21st-Century technologies and vulnerable bodies and ecologies. The panel conveners welcome contributions from scholars or experienced practitioners willing to engage robustly with the toxic perils of the contemporary world and the potential for ethnography to interpret fraught sites of human injustice and perseverance.
Territoriality and Wellbeing: indigenous concernsA key aspect of improving Indigenous wellbeing is exploring the relationship between land and wellbeing. The central argument is that Indigenous health strategies should take into consideration the importance of dialogue with the national states to maximise their effectiveness.Wellbeing,Health ,TerritoriesAcademic Degree: Professor
Name: Maria Beldi de Alcantara
Institution / affiliation: University of São Paulo
City: Sao Paulo
Country: Brazil
Academic Degree: Coordenador of Latin America
Name: Alejandro Parellada
Institution / affiliation: International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs
City: Compenhagen
Country: Denmark
Social determinants theory recognises that many interconnected social factors determine population health and inequality. Likewise, it is a basic tenet of human rights law that all rights are interconnected and that impacting on the enjoyment of one right will impact on the enjoyment of others. Because of this dialogue, human rights. the rights of indigenous territories discourse and health policies must be interdisciplinary and intercultural.
When we talk about the indigenous peoples the evidence existed which suggests there are positive physical health outcomes from living or working on their territories if the dialogue between traditional and biomedical health can discuss all time. To that, those peoples must be living in their lands.
This Panel aims to discuss the experiences and works what can bring the connexion between territories and well being.
The education of the circus and funfair workers’ children [Commission on Nomadic Peoples]This panel aims at investigating into the schooling of the circus and funfair workers’ children in various geo-political contexts (European and non-European), as well as any family education models which often accompany or alternate with those proposed by scholastic institutions to these students.anthropology of education; circus and funfair workers; ethnography of schoolingAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Stefania Pontrandolfo
Institution / affiliation: Verona University - Italy
City: Verona
Country: Italy
Academic Degree: Master's Degree
Name: Laura Secchi
Institution / affiliation: Seville University - Spain
City: Modena
Country: Italy
Many workers in the circus and travelling entertainment sectors can be defined as service provider nomads, that is, professionals who move with their attractions (circuses and amusement rides) offering entertainment to a public of all ages and following precise itineraries for a certain period of the year, governed by local festival calendars (political and religious) in the places where they perform their activities. It is an economic business mainly based on a family organization which implies the movement of whole groups of families rather than individuals during the travelling period. Circus and funfair workers’ children temporarily leave the schools in the town where they normally live and continue lessons in the cities where their parents are momentarily working.
This panel aims at investigating into the schooling experience of these students by presenting studies conducted in various geo-political contexts (European and non-European), bearing in mind that, in the majority of cases studied in literature so far, national school systems are ill-prepared in offering a quality service that can adapt to these students’ flexibility since they were established with the explicit intent to create “good national citizens” through a process of national homogenisation and sedentarisation, rather than to adapt to the particular and differentiated needs of nomad users.
Papers are hereby solicited regarding the schooling of circus and travelling entertainment family children as well as any family education models which often accompany or alternate with those proposed by scholastic institutions to these students.
The Intersections of Tourism, Migration, and Exile [Commission on the Anthropology of Tourism & Commission on the Anthropology of Migration]The panel’s aim is to explore the intersecting terrain between the varied forms of spatial mobility in order to problematize the seemingly-fixed boundaries separating tourism, migration, and exile. We invite scholars to discuss how these mobilities intertwine, overlap, and influence one another.tourism, migration, exile, mobility, conceptual boundariesAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Natalia Bloch
Institution / affiliation: Warsaw University
City: Warsaw
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: Professor
Name: Kathleen M. Adams
Institution / affiliation: Loyola University Chicago
City: Chicago
Country: USA
Academic Degree: Professor
Name: Adriana Piscitelli
Institution / affiliation: State University of Campinas
City: Campinas
Country: Brazil
The aim of the panel is to explore the intersecting terrain between the varied forms of spatial mobility. Our goal is to problematize the seemingly-fixed boundaries separating tourism, migration, and exile. We invite scholars interested in discussing how these mobilities intertwine, overlap and influence one another. Such intersections are multidimensional and multidirectional: migrants and established exiles can act as tourists; refugee communities might be the tourist attractions; migrants often work as laborers and entrepreneurs in the tourism sector; tourists, on the other hand, turn into migrant-entrepreneurs in the tourism sector or combine tourism with work.
While tourism, migration and exile are usually researched and theorized separately, we believe that transcending the categorical boundaries within the anthropology of mobility and considering how differentiated distributions of power permeate them will contribute to social critiques of the way various forms of mobility are conceptualized in public discourses related to gender, class, ethnic, racial, and global inequalities (e.g. tourists from the Global North as cosmopolitan nomads versus migrants from the Global South as intruders). We hope that through deconstructing the conceptual foundations of these moral valorizations of people’s movement will enable us to built world solidarities with those whose movement is restrained.
We are interested in both empirical case studies and discussions exploring how the above intersections enable us to deconstruct dichotomous classifications within mobility studies (tourists vs. migrants, migrants vs. refugees, leisure vs. work, voluntary vs. forced migration, etc.).
The Political Economy of Social Exclusion and the Policy of Inclusion [Commission on Human Rights and Commission on Marginalization and Global Apartheid]Social exclusion is a social construct practised in many societies. The present conference will address the following issues: meaning and manifestations, historical and cultural interpretations, social practices, academic and policy studies, inclusive policies and the new movements.Keywords: social exclusión, inclusive policies, social practices, human rights, inequalitiesAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Annapurna Pandey
Institution / affiliation: University of California
City: Santa Cruz
Country: USA
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: María Victoria Chenaut
Institution / affiliation: Center for Research and Advanced Studies in Social Anthropology (CIESAS)
City: Xalapa, Veracruz
Country: Mexico
In a fast developing world, a rising consciousness is emerging with regard to human rights, citizenship, individual dignity, social and distributive justice and equality. This has made social, political and economic inclusion a clarion call for the nation-states. Social exclusion is a social construct and is practised in many societies. It negates the basic principles of democracy and human rights, particularly the developing world falls victim to it. In such societies, identity search remains constant and continuous for some groups who struggle hard to get a space in the mainstream of the society. These groups are kept out and remain at the margin of the society. One often hears that it has been a phenomenon of the past but practice of the present.
Taking into consideration that social exclusion is a multifactorial and multidimensional process the present conference session will address the following issues:
. Combining the textual view and the field based view with regard to meaning and manifestations of social exclusion.
. Social exclusion and Inequalities : class, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, citizenship, etc.
. Historical and cultural interpretations of social exclusion. The traditional typology and the emerging ones.
. Social Exclusion in different contexts: Community, Culture, Ethnicity, Geography. Social practices of stigmatization, segregation and shaming.
. Academic and Policy studies and their findings on social exclusion.
. The Political economy of Social Exclusion. Inclusive policies; good practices,changes and challenges. The new movements and the resultants.

The Role of Ethnographical Museums and Cultural Heritage in promoting the World Solidarity through artfacts and symbols [IUAES Commission on Museums and Cukltural Heritage]The IUAES Commission of the Anthropological Museum and Cultural Heritage can be bridge between the surrounding cultures, provideng also the knowledge of the tribal communities of other countries. The countries should develop regional ethnographical museums and encourage research in other cultures.Ethnography, Museum, Waning cultures, media , symbolsAcademic Degree: Ph.D
Name: Mohan K. Gautam
Institution / affiliation: European University of West & East
City: Leiden
Country: Netherlands
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Satya N. Munda
Institution / affiliation: Dr. Shyama Prasad Mukherjee University
City: Ranchi
Country: India
Researches and exhibitions on the ethographic collections of regional museums can be an asset for the enhancement of new theories . Regional museum can work as a bridge between various cultures and illuminate the need for the develop of national solidarity. Unfortunately, in many countries people do not have a sense of their own cultures and communities. If there is a natural crises people do not know even the geographical location of the regions. There is a need to develop the regional museums which are the part of the local cultures. This will help to create a national identity and a sense of world solidarity. Most of the national museums in various countries do not know have the arifacts of even neighbouring countries. The idea about the cultures of the people , residing in other continents are not known. An Anthroplogical student of a university does know about the cultures and tribal communities of other countries. He knows the name because of the research of famous anthropologists.The ethnographical museums can suppliment the information and bring the other communites as a visual text book to the social sciences. Museum exhibitions should also rotate to other countries and display the unknown cultures with the help of photograps, films, exhibitions and publications. Unlike Boas, Malinowski , Levi Srauss and others , who not only created concepts but also collected objects and exhibited in museums. Museums with cultures can create a world solidarity and enhace our sciences.
The Social Life and Afterlife of Socialist MonumentsThis panel will examine various uses of monuments in socialist and postsocialist contexts across the globe, focusing on the multiple meanings and political effects of such public objects and the practices related to them.socialism, postsocialism, monumentsAcademic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Joao Felipe Goncalves
Institution / affiliation: University of Sao Paulo
City: Sao Paulo
Country: Brazil
Academic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Daniela Koleva
Institution / affiliation: Sofia University
City: Sofia
Country: Bulgaria
This panel will examine the uses of monuments in socialist and postsocialist contexts across the globe, discussing people’s interactions with these public objects in various practices, such as rituals, political spectacles, joke telling, inscriptions of graffiti, physical interventions, visual reproductions, vandalism, and other forms of resignification. Questions that the papers might address include (but are not limited to): How visible are monuments built or used in socialist and postsocialist contexts? How have they been appropriated by various social actors? What values and meanings do different groups attach to them, and how have they changed over time? What roles do materiality and immateriality play in the various uses of socialist monuments? What kinds of solidarities and exclusions do such monuments help produce and signify? To what extent do vernacular practices and meanings associated with these monuments reproduce, subvert, or overlap with official state discourses? How do these monuments and their uses express and affect power relations? Why are they the object of so many disputes and resignifications? What is the political value of monuments?
The goal of the panel is to establish a wide transnational dialogue that will lead to fruitful comparisons based on a variety of particular analyses. As such, we welcome papers about cases from different countries and continents, and particularly encourage submissions about non-European socialist and postsocialist contexts.
The Socio economics of SolidaritiesHistorically and Anthropologically , people undertake group formation when they perceive a threat to their livelihood and life. In a world where nation states are seeking newer identities in the context of globalization, understanding the other has become important.Food prices, solidarities, rights, land ownership, powerAcademic Degree: Ph.D.
Name: Debasis Patnaik
Institution / affiliation: BITS Pilani Goa Campus
City: Vasco, Goa
Country: India
Historically and Anthropologically , people undertake group formation when they perceive a threat to their livelihood and life. In a world where nation states are seeking newer identities in the context of globalization, understanding the other has become important. But even this moderate academic quest hits a barrier when identities gets juxtaposed with aspirations. Behavioral structures are shaped by both economics power equations and history. This paper looks into solidarity movements in Poland, Spain and India with referral context with other parts of the globe including New Zealand Taiwan and Africa. Food prices, rights over land, occupation and governance rights is an outcome for short term and cause for long term persistent trends in data and attitudes.
The solidarity of labour and the labour of solidarity [Commission on Global Transformations and Marxian Anthropology]This panel will feature papers that explore the prospects for labour solidarity within and beyond national boundaries nearly four decades after Solidarność, in the present era of employment precarity and anxiety, and right-wing populisms.labour, solidarity, right-wing populismsAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Chandana Mathur
Institution / affiliation: National University of Ireland, Maynooth
City: Maynooth
Country: Ireland
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Sharryn Kasmir
Institution / affiliation: Hofstra University
City: Hempstead, NY
Country: USA
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Kathy Powell
Institution / affiliation: National University of Ireland, Galway
City: Galway
Country: Ireland
What are the prospects for labour solidarity within and beyond national boundaries nearly four decades after Solidarność, in the present era of employment precarity and anxiety, and right-wing populisms? Is solidarity rendered impossible, or is it assuming new forms under the flexible, individualising work regimes of today? Has the notion of labour solidarity become selective, as the scapegoating of populations of supposed economic competitors for work becomes widespread? What are the prospects for solidarity with and among residual, ‘surplus’ populations? How international are present day labour movements? What are the principles that ground labour solidarity work in those locations where it is actively being pursued? What are the hidden histories of labour solidarity and the meanings that they have gathered over time? This panel calls upon participants to address these and other related questions as they pertain to their various anthropological contexts.
The Sunset population, Interactions, Bonds (Commission on Urban Anthropology)In the current panel, papers are invited to interpret various discourses of gerontology. Here are some of the subthemes. • Elderly solidarity • Elderly interactions • Elderly constructions • Abuse • Elderly and media • Elderly and quality of life • Elderly vulnerabilitiesOldage, Abuse, Social BondAcademic Degree: PhD.
Name: Sumita Saha
Institution / affiliation: Presidency University
City: Kolkata
Country: India
Gerontology, the study of aging, has been a subject of enquiry among different sections of society and institutions. Advancement in science followed by rising life expectancy and falling birth rates, average age of population is going up. In this regard, the world is marching towards ‘graying of population’, which inherently has been treated as a social crisis. Families and other institutions treat and make the elderly people believe, that they are unwanted. Owing to the growth of nuclear families as well as the dominance virtual space, face to face interactions which often enhanced social solidarity is waning. Elderly loneliness has thus been a major issue often been a cause of abuse, vulnerability as well as degrading health both physical and mental. Thus it is apt to remark that in the present day society, elderly population rise is an invincible fact coterminous with the degrading social bond. We often visualize them as someone characterized by physical deformities, mental problems, frailty, homely, religious and most importantly as someone who lives in home and awaits death by reminiscing bygone days. The elderly paradox is hidden within this mental imagery of the social structure as a whole, which had consciously provoked and distributed an elderly construction which is inherently cultural. Quite appropriately it can be remarked that the idea of being elderly is indeed a social construction which often can be metaphorically compared with the notion of ‘jacket’ which has been put on the people who are above 60s by an intangible determined force.

The value of anthropology to therapists, counselors, coaches and educational professionals [IUAES Commission on Anthropology and Education]The panel will present and discuss the contribution of anthropologists and the cross-cultural perspective in the context of therapy, counselling, coaching. It is relevant for research, practice and policy. It is for various participants who work with professionals or practise in these fields.Anthropology, Cross-Cultural Perspective, Therapy, Counselling, CoachingAcademic Degree: Dr.
Name: Malka Shabtay
Institution / affiliation: Ministry of Education
City: Modiin
Country: Israel
Academic Degree: Dr.
Name: Kiran Lata Dangwal
Institution / affiliation: University of Lucknow
City: Lucknow
Country: India
In recent years we have witnessed more and more anthropologists doing research and practising their knowledge and skills in the context of therapy, counselling and coaching, sometimes as partners in multidisciplinary teams, as advisers and guides for professionals in these fields, and some as professionals who combine anthropology and these practices. We will consider how anthropology can benefit therapists, counsellors and coaches. Additionally, we will consider the contributions anthropology has made to various educational professionals including teachers, school directors and educational psychologists. It is time to share, discuss and organize our knowledge and skills, so we can share between us and use it to train anthropologists for this great potential for practising anthropology.
Topologies of ContentionThrough the notion of topology, this panel explores relations between political contention and diverse kinds of space – physical, virtual, embodied, animate or spiritual. We also look for unconventional shapes the political may take in a world marked by a reshuffling of spatial relations and scales.Anthropocene, globalization, the political, resistance, spaceAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Mateusz Laszczkowski
Institution / affiliation: University of Warsaw
City: Warsaw
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Olivia Casagrande
Institution / affiliation: The University of Manchester
City: Manchester
Country: United Kingdom
This panel explores the spatial dimensions of the political, with a particular focus on contention and resistance. The world today is marked by a reshuffling of scale and spatial relations. For instance, capitalism, having arguably colonized the entire planet, penetrates into the intimacies of everyday lives and bodies. The cumulative consequences of our everyday lifestyle practices come back with a vengeance, with Anthropocenic climate change and intercontinental mass displacement. But at the same time, resistance flourishes everywhere, as actors seek new ways of living together with others and creating ‘world solidarities’. Through the notion of topologies we seek to explore the mutually constitutive relations between a plurality of different possible spaces ‑ physical, symbolic, ecological, embodied, virtual, animate, spiritual ‑ and contentious political dynamics. Our use of the term ‘topology’ is also meant to suggest a diversity of unconventional shapes that the political may take. How are diverse kinds of space created out of contentious engagements, and in turn, how do they foster resistance, new political subjectivities, and collectives? Furthermore, topological thinking implies destabilizing conventional notions of scale. How might we account for the ways in which intimate conflicts, or situated place-based resistances, open out to planetary urgencies, without presupposing the existence of determinant ‘bigger’ systems or structures? More broadly, how might the notion of topology expand the horizon of the politically possible, for actors involved in political struggles as well as for analysts? How to ethnographically study the topological qualities of the political?
Tourism Solidarities: From Self to Other and Anthropology [Anthropology of Tourism Commission]What does tourism do for the self, the other and the we? This panel looks at the cultural dynamics of tourism and how it informs anthropological debate on the human nature of the singular and the plural?tourism, solidarity, individual, community, voluntourismAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Magdalena Banaszkiewicz
Institution / affiliation: Faculty of International and Political Studies
City: Krakow
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Jonathan Skinner
Institution / affiliation: University of Roehampton
City: London
Country: United Kingdom
Is tourism all about the I and the eyes? What does tourism do for the self, the other and the we? Does tourism unite or divide people and groups whether host, guest or self? How has the shift in the anthropology of tourism to examine tourism imaginaries and tourist mobilities impacted on the anthropology of community?

This panel welcomes papers that consider some of the above questions through an ethnographic and/or theoretical engagement with tourist practices such as: voluntourism, sustainable development and tourism, compassionate tourism, solidarity tourism and political tourism. Panelists might want to engage historically with the shifts in tourism practices from mass tourism to de-differentiated niche tourism and even virtual tourism. Is this a shift from dysfunctional practice by sun-tanned destroyers of culture to sympathetic responsible engagement with the Other? Predicated upon difference, and paid for through economics, how does the cultural dynamics of tourism, its ethics and ethnics, its technologies and mediations, inform anthropological debate on the human nature of the singular and the plural? We welcome submissions engaging with the above topics and issues, but also those that use related material to give fresh insights on solidarity, community and individuality in the anthropology of tourism.
Training the Sublime: Between the Spiritualization of Sport and the Sportization of Religion [Anthropology of Sports Commission]In this panel, we want to trace the meaning-making in sport from the perspective of religion and spirituality welcoming analytical and ethnographic papers investigating the blurred borders between religion, spirituality, and sport.Sport, religion, spirituality, transcendence, way of lifeAcademic Degree: M.A.
Name: Raphael Schapira
Institution / affiliation: The Graduate Institute Geneva
City: Berlin
Country: Germany
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Mariachiara Giorda
Institution / affiliation: Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici (RomaTre)
City: Rome
Country: Italy
Sport has become ubiquitous in recent years turning the sport complex as the totality of activities, institutions, markets, and logics related to sport into a key motor of social change. People increasingly relate to sport as a form of self-fashioning and self-making, be it as consumers, readers, practitioners, and spectators. Why is this so? What is the meaning that people put into sports which could explain this phenomenon? In this panel, we want to trace the meaning-making in sports from the perspective of religion and spirituality. We think that despite anthropology’s tradition of analyzing sport as a form of collective effervescence, further investigation on how people understand sport in religious and spiritual terms is needed. The dichotomy between religion and sport as a solely secular activity has become obsolete as the meaning that practitioners and fans put into sport are imbued with religious signs. The shift towards individual experiences of religion, as currently most strongly expressed by Pentecostalism, further blurs the line between sport and religion in that it allows religious sport practitioners to understand physical exercising as an expression of religiosity. Sport may function as a substitute for religion, or as a ‘secular religion,’ in the contemporary spiritual marketplace. The feeling of community, of belonging to something bigger than oneself in conjunction with a sense of holism make sport practitioners understand the related corporeal activities as a spiritual practice. For this panel, we welcome analytical and ethnographic papers investigating the blurred borders between religion, spirituality, and sport.
Truth Matters? Anthropological ConversationsQuestions of truth are increasingly important, both in the current conjuncture and the conversations of intellectual worlds in doubt. We take the matter of truth within, and for, anthropology, aiming to enrich the ability to speak truth to power, and to help anthropology do this job with precisionTruth, Epistemology, Theory, Power, AnthropologyAcademic Degree: Doctor
Name: Damian O. Martinez
Institution / affiliation: Anthropological Theory and University of Tuebingen
City: Tuebingen
Country: Germany
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Stephen Reyna
Institution / affiliation: Anthropological Theory and University of New Hampshire
City: Durham
Country: USA
Questions of truth have become increasingly important, both in the hurly-burly of a conjuncture of crisis and the conversations of intellectual worlds in doubt. Is the President Trump correct, and it is true that climate change is no crisis, just a ‘Chinese hoax’? Is the philosopher Richard Rorty spot-on, and there are simply positions in ‘conversations’, no truths -with only political, historical or aesthetic grounds for taking one position over another?

This session takes up the matter of truth within, and for, anthropology. It does so by inviting papers that contribute answers to the following questions:

- What have different approaches to truth been in the history of anthropology?
- Are there different types of truth –absolute truths, approximate truths, partial truths, multiple truths, relative truths, regimes of truth, all of the above?
- Is it possible to distinguish between the truthfulness of truths? If so, how!
- Is there a political-economy of truth?
- How is it possible to make the search for anthropological truths more rigorous?

The session’s goal is to encourage a double conversation: first, generally, to enrich the intellectual ability to speak truth to power; and second, specifically, to help anthropology do this job with spirited precision.
Urban Flooding: Inequalities, Development and Human Rights at the Edge of Climate Change [Commission on Anthropology and Environment; Commission on the Anthropology of Public Policy and Development Practice]This panel explores displacements of climate change and other challenges of the Anthropocene: the relationship between people, materials and the environment in a rapidly changing world.Human rights, urban, development, environment, climate changeAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Heather OLeary
Institution / affiliation: University of South Florida
City: St Petersburg
Country: USA
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Sumita Chaudhuri
Institution / affiliation: Calcutta University
City: Kolkata
Country: India
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Soumendra Patnaik
Institution / affiliation: Utkal University
City: Bhubneswar
Country: India
By 2050, 70% of our population is predicted to live in cities, with most of the absolute growth in Asia, where many urbanites already face water crisis and whose cities are among the soonest predicted for climate change destruction.Seemingly apolitical materialities of resource risk have long haunted us, forming a legacy from specters of population crisis enduring since the 1700s to the twenty-first century’s mounting threats of climate change shocks, large-scale urban migrations and accelerating disparity.

Anthropology provides new lenses for interpreting the significance of euphemisms like “flow” that naturalize climate casualties.It documents the depictions of hydro-social urban flooding and how these depictions impact development, urban life, and human rights. Floods lap across barriers, obscure solid ground, and in their recession, they unmoor familiar underpinnings.Floods are typically conceptualized as material, but they can also represent the complex ways socio-political movements change course across space and time, river-like braided shifts of discourse and representation, and the unexpected swells in trans-corporeal human risk.

As with water, risk manifests when people are deemed out of place. Managing the projected climate change refugee exodus is the newest form of population control, and is by no means apolitical. This panel explores the dimensions of urban flooding, not just as environmental or socio-economic risks, but as human-material processes that cloak violent epistemological frameworks.By viewing precarity through anthropological lenses, these ontologies become a critical site for explicit and covert contestations of authority over our planet, our cities, our rights and our bodies.
Urban struggles: governance, resistance and solidarityWhile more and more urban residents struggle to meet even the most basic needs for housing, security and income, city governments address the symptoms, rather than causes, of inequalities. This panel explores how urban actors resist exclusionary governance, while generating new forms of solidarity.urban governance, resistance, solidarity, activism, right to the cityAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Flávio Eiró
Institution / affiliation: Radboud University
City: Nijmegen
Country: Netherlands
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Insa Koch
Institution / affiliation: London School of Economics
City: London
Country: United Kingdom
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Raúl Acosta
Institution / affiliation: University of Konstanz
City: Konstanz
Country: Germany
Across the globe, a growing number of urban dwellers struggle to meet even the most basic needs for housing, security and income. In response, governments showcase programmes like social housing, community policing, cash transfers, or professionalisation training. However, these programmes tend to be palliative, addressing merely the symptoms of inequalities rather than their causes. Meanwhile, policies implemented in the name of ‘good governance’, ‘participation’ or ‘crisis management’ risk reinforcing social exclusion of the most marginalised. Cases include evictions, gated communities, securitisation, austerity measures, management of migrant populations, and the regulation of the informal sector.
This panel addresses both the resistance to, and reproduction of exclusionary urban policies. We are particularly interested in how residents and professionals alike engage urban programmes through activism, creative navigation of existing rules, or by way of withdrawal and outright sabotage. Our panel connects empirical studies to theoretical debates on the right to the city, activated and activist citizenship, and the idea of the city as an assemblage of productive tensions. We ask: how do defeatist visions of the city produced by accumulation by dispossession speak to more expectant notions of urban navigations and creativity? How does resistance transform neoliberal cities into sites for alternative imaginaries and new forms of inclusion, citizenship and solidarity? We welcome papers that present empirically rich anthropological analyses of urban dwellers’ opposition and resistance to urban governance, showing how people struggle for their place in the city while also generating forms of solidarity.
Visualizing Ethnicity: Museum ProjectionsMuseum exhibit viewing via visual anthropology/ethnography approaches allows re-examining the object-image disposition and trajectory in both ethnic and museum environment. The museum-exhibition-building may be variously interconnected with the ethnic revitalization initiatives.ethnicity, visuality, museum, exhibit, imageAcademic Degree: professor, member of Russian Academy of
Name: Andrei Golovnev
Institution / affiliation: Kunstkamera, Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography
City: St Petersburg
Country: Russia
Academic Degree: master
Name: Sakurako Koresawa
Institution / affiliation: Tohoku University
City: Sendai
Country: Japan
Regarding the museum as a space of visual anthropology/ethnography allows re-examining a sequence of images and meanings that accompany the transition of an object from ethnic culture to a museum exhibition. An object (made, used, kept), its design (ornament, shape, colour), its image (photograph, video), the visual aesthetic and conceptual context of its display (publication, exhibition), and its ‘return’ back to actual and/or virtual reality constitute a trajectory (set of trajectories) of states and transitions of objects in cultural environment. Ethnicity and visuality are multiply, sometimes eccentrically, intertwined. The ethnic museum displays, open air museums, and ethno-parks particularly relevant to ethno-revitalization projects. The indigenous communities’ members are part of the staff of many ethnographic museums, and the museums themselves have become the centers of traditional knowledge and experience, their accumulation and storage for the preservation and use of the ethno-cultural heritage. A museum exhibit within the context of the ethnic culture may acquire various forms, and the ethnicity display can significantly differ from the ordinary demonstration of ethnographic items. The complex of identities is multiplied in web-projections. Cyberspace does not only reflect the real state of ethnicity, but it also gives rise to a new ‘net-ethnicity’ that has a vast, yet vague, potential. The virtual photo- and video-boom, including abundant selfies, opens new vistas for studying visual practices as a means to present and broadcast one’s identity. Projections to past and future, to different cultures and countries, to experiences and reflections of museums and exhibits are welcomed on the panel.
Wandering Cultures at the Turn of the 20th and 21st Centuries in Central, Eastern and Southern Europe. Experience, Memory, NarrationWandering has had various dimensions conditioned by social-historical context in the 20th and 21st centuries in Central, Eastern and Southern Europe. The experience of wandering has been the most important part of our memory as well as part of the heritage/burden of the past in the present.Wandering Cultures, Central, Eastern and Southern Europe, Experience, Memory, NarrationAcademic Degree: phd
Name: Marta Cobel - Tokarska
Institution / affiliation: Akademia Pedagogiki Specjalnej im. Marii Grzegorzewskiej
City: Warsaw
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: phd
Name: Claudia -Florentina Dobre
Institution / affiliation: Centre for Memory and Identity Studies (CSMI)
City: Bucharest
Country: Romania
Aimless wandering from place to place has had various dimensions conditioned by social-historical context in the 20th and 21st centuries in Central, Eastern and Southern Europe.
Adopted exceptional forms as exile during wars and revolutions being a result of ethnic and political persecution, war damage, famine. In the period of peace, wandering was also a response to poverty, including people’s need for shelter and work. For the Roma and Sinti, wandering has been associated with their nomadic tradition included in their long history of traversing the world rather than settling it. Wandering has been also a choice of a lifestyle of artists - flaneurs and tourists – seeking, in the "way without an aim", experiences, emotions and inspiration for their creativity. Nowadays, when some people still experience wandering as a burden, others decide to pay a high price to be participants of wandering tourism. Apart from people, also animals and objects have been wanderers.
The experience of wandering in its various dimensions has been the most important part of memory of Eastern, Central and Southern Europe in the 20th/21st century and work of that memory is still a rich source of wandering narratives.
In this context, we propose the following issues of our session:
- diversity of experiences, memories and narratives of wandering
- people, animals and objects as actors of wandering
- transitions between experience, memory and narration concerning wandering
- experience, memory and narration of wandering and the present challenge of exile.
What the cities do to anthropologyThe panel will examine the evolution of classical anthropological concepts in urban contexts. To what extent do they remain relevant to capturing their global and local realities ? Does the anthropological approach make it possible to shed specific light on the social issues that arise in the city?cities, concept, evolution, glocalisationAcademic Degree: PHD
Name: Sophie Gravereau
Institution / affiliation: ULCO
City: Lille
Country: France
Academic Degree: HDR
Name: Anne Raulin
Institution / affiliation: University of Nanterre
City: Nanterre
Country: France
Academic Degree: PHD
Name: Mina Saidi-Shahrouz
Institution / affiliation: école d'architecture de la Villette
City: Paris
Country: France
The aim will be to examine the validity and evolution of classical concepts and objects of anthropology in contemporary urban contexts, including ethnicity, custom, tradition, belief, ritual... To what extent do they remain relevant to understanding contemporary urban phenomena? How to avoid the risks of essentialization without neglecting cultural variability. What has become of the concepts of culture or cultural area? Does the anthropological approach make it possible to shed specific light on the social issues that arise in the city?
Urban anthropology is constantly evolving in contact with many disciplines concerned with cities and their global and local redeployment. What do the debates on the joint transformations of the city and discipline tell us? In view of the legacies of the different schools of thought, where are the theoretical dividing lines today?
It will also examine the trajectory of concepts initially created to capture urban cultural dynamics (identification, style, cultural complexity, subculture, cosmopolitanism, etc.) that have become key concepts in the anthropology of globalization. What does anthropology do in the city? If comparison is the foundation of anthropology, how can we rethink its contemporary uses, in the light of its multiple decentralization that has occurred over the course of colonial, decolonial and then post-colonial history?
Women in the History of Anthropology [Commission on Global Feminisms and Queer Politics]The open panel will allow the construction of a dense reflection on the impacts of feminism on the history of anthropology, as well as the recognition and appreciation of the contributions of women, indigenous, queer, trans *, black and other subalternized groups in the history of the discipline.Anthropology, History of Anthropology, Feminism, Queer, WomenAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Felipe Bruno Martins Fernandes
Institution / affiliation: Federal University of Bahia
City: Salvador
Country: Brazil
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Susana Rostagnol
Institution / affiliation: Universidad de la República
City: Montevidéu
Country: Uruguay
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Miriam Pillar Grossi
Institution / affiliation: Federal University of Santa Catarina
City: Florianópolis
Country: Brazil
Anthropology suffered in the 1960s an important shift. The approaches that were positioned as neutral or distant from the object studied, as well as those colonialist positions, came to live with engaged perspectives in which there was adhesion of the researcher with the struggles for justice and social transformation involving the movements studied. This turnaround was made possible, to a great extent, by the contribution of women to the discipline that, by theorizing subjectivity, agency and power constructed the conditions of this displacement. Women are present throughout the history of anthropology, despite the more widespread versions that make them invisible and that assume their contributions as less relevant. Nowadays, in spite of the various initiatives of Feminist Anthropology in refocusing anthropological thinking from the lens of gender and sexuality, the discipline still shapes itself as an androcentric dimension of reality. The anthropological canon recognizes few women and undergraduate and postgraduate courses have a predominantly male bibliography. Currently, in world anthropologies, women are the majority in associations. Even so, when speaking of “anthropological theory”, there is not enough recognition of the production of women. The open panel will allow the construction of a reflection on the impacts of feminism on the history of anthropology, as well as the recognition and appreciation of the contributions of women, indigenous, queer, trans, black and other subalternized groups. We desire to impact on the field's theoretical framework, expanding the participation of more symmetrical and decolonial reflections in the world anthropological canon.
World solidarities in action - Anthropologies of revolutionary and other anti-systemic movements, past and present [Commission on Global Transformations and Marxian Anthropology]This panel calls for papers that present in-depth analyses of historical and contemporary revolutionary and other anti-systemic movements. We call on presenters to assess successes and failures of such movements, either based on case studies or on comparisons thereof.revolutionary movements, anti-systemic movements, capitalism, labor, counter-politicsAcademic Degree: Assistant Professor (Tenured)
Name: Luisa Steur
Institution / affiliation: University of Amsterdam
City: Amsterdam
Country: Netherlands
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Patrick Neveling
Institution / affiliation: University of Bergen
City: Bergen
Country: Norway
With global capitalism creating ever-intensifying environmental disaster and encouraging the rise of the extreme Right, it is of paramount importance for critical social scientists to assess and debate radical, fundamental alternatives to the current condition. This panel calls for papers that present in-depth analyses of historical and contemporary revolutionary and other anti-systemic movements. We call on presenters to assess successes and failures of such movements, either based on case studies or on comparisons thereof.
We invite speakers to be bold. Empirical and analytical pathways could involve: -to expand on recent anthropologies of urban mass mobilisations (Kalb & Mollona) and counter-politics (Smith),
-to assess what qualifies a given movement as anti-systemic,
-to evaluate the im-/possibilities for revolutionary movements in past and present in the spirit of Eric Wolf’s Peasant Wars of the 20thCentury,
-to grasp the specific ways financialized and other forms of capitalism condition the terrain of struggle for radical movements today,
-to analyze when and how labor succeeds to confront capitalism as a racialized, gendered and imperialist system.
World solidarity with the indigenous peoples of Xinjiang, ChinaA campaign of forced cultural assimilation and re-education is underway in Xinjiang, China, targeting indigenous Uighur and Kazakh people. This panel will discuss the forced assimilation, the detention camps, as well as worldwide solidarity with the indigenous peoples and the refugee diaspora.Uighur [Uyghur], Kazakh, forced assimilation, re-education camps, China, XinjiangAcademic Degree: PhD
Name: Magnus Fiskesjö
Institution / affiliation: Cornell University
City: Ithaca
Country: USA
Academic Degree: PhD
Name: Rune Steenberg
Institution / affiliation: University of Copenhagen
City: Copenhagen
Country: Denmark
During 2017 and 2018 the Chinese authorities launched an intensive campaign of forced cultural assimilation and mass detentions in Xinjiang, western China. The indigenous Uighur [Uyghur] and Kazakh peoples are the main targets. Their use of local languages, customs and symbols is widely restricted. This includes religious practice and different forms of social gatherings. The adoption of modern Chinese ways of living and acting is strongly encouraged, sometimes coerced or even forced. The campaign includes mass relocations, as well as the internment of hundreds of thousands of people in punitive 're-education' camps, where they are subjected to harsh indoctrination. Officially the campaign targets those with radical religious or separatist views; potential terrorists and subversive “two-faced” cadre. Yet, ordinary people have reportedly been interned for merely having relatives abroad or for being categorized as “unsafe” in the social credit score system – often due to simple infringements of the demands of the assimilation campaign. Hundreds of prominent indigenous cultural and religious figures, intellectuals and business people, most of whom were previously well integrated into the Chinese government and economic system, have also been interned in the camps. The battle for hearts and minds in Xinjiang has in the past two years taken on a new coercive and violent quality. In this panel, we welcome papers on the ongoing campaign of forced assimilation and on the detention camps; and especially also on worldwide solidarity with the targeted indigenous peoples and the Uighur and Kazakh refugee diaspora.
Young Adult Women and their Biological and Social Roles in Contemporary World: [Commission on Anthropology of Women]This panel aims at studying the association between the psychosocial work environment and biological/health/well-being effects. The panel discussion will present and discuss anthropologic evidence that adverse social exposure impacts women’s biology and hinders their progression in the work place.women’s biology, psychosocial stress, workplace conditions, sexismAcademic Degree: Professor
Name: Maria Agnieszka Kaczmarek
Institution / affiliation: Adam Mickiewicz Univeristy
City: Poznan
Country: Poland
Academic Degree: Dr.
Name: Ga Wu
Institution / affiliation: YASS Yunnan Academy of Social Sciences HAO
City: Xinhong
Country: China
There is growing evidence for changing pattern of reproductive behaviour among young adult women aged 18-35. They are now more likely to remain childless, have their first child in their early/late 30s substantially limit the number of offspring and to be fully-paid working as compared to their peers over twenty five years ago. Yet, these women have to confront conflicting expectations at home and at the work place. Aiming at better understanding a work-home discrepancy (social vs biological roles), the panel discussion will focus on psychosocial constraints of women’s biology. Following issues will be discussed: the biological capacity of young women for pregnancy and motherhood; women’s multiple roles, psychosocial stress exposure and acute stress responses in women’s biology, health and quality of life; workplace conditions, systemic sexism, and how anthropology research is working and producing evidence that sexism impacts biology and hinders women’s progression in the work place. A multifactorial approach in cross-cultural research using different explanatory models should bring the framework for the final conclusion and recommendations.